Quantcast

Latest UC Stories

2012-03-13 09:10:04

One in 10 people living in California's most productive agricultural areas is at risk for harmful levels of nitrate contamination in their drinking water, according to a report released today by the University of California, Davis. The report was commissioned by the California State Water Resources Control Board. "Cleaning up nitrate in groundwater is a complex problem with no single solution," said Jay Lund, director of the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences and a report co-author....

2012-02-06 13:22:08

Successful testing in mice paves the way toward human trials for patients with osteoporosis A research team led by UC Davis Health System scientists has developed a novel technique to enhance bone growth by using a molecule which, when injected into the bloodstream, directs the body's stem cells to travel to the surface of bones. Once these cells are guided to the bone surface by this molecule, the stem cells differentiate into bone-forming cells and synthesize proteins to enhance bone...

Flies And Mice Help Scientists Get To The Heart Of Down Syndrome
2011-11-04 10:19:17

[ Watch the Video ] A novel study involving fruit flies and mice has allowed biologists to identify two critical genes responsible for congenital heart defects in individuals with Down syndrome, a major cause of infant mortality and death in people born with this genetic disorder. In a paper published in the November 3 issue of the open access journal PLoS Genetics, researchers from UC San Diego, the Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., and the University of...

2011-09-07 13:58:25

Neurosurgery researchers at UC Davis Health System have used a new, leading-edge stem cell therapy to promote the growth of bone tissue following the removal of cervical discs -- the cushions between the bones in the neck -- to relieve chronic, debilitating pain. The procedure was performed by associate professors of neurosurgery Kee Kim and Rudolph Schrot. It used bone marrow-derived adult stem cells to promote the growth of the bone tissue essential for spinal fusion following surgery,...

2011-07-20 17:29:23

The loss of a protein that coats sperm may explain a significant proportion of infertility in men worldwide, according to a study by an international team of researchers led by UC Davis. The research could open up new ways to screen and treat couples for infertility. A paper describing the work is published July 20 in the journal Science Translational Medicine. The protein DEFB126 acts as a "Klingon cloaking device," allowing sperm to swim through mucus and avoid the immune system in order to...

9fd90160e7a348060ca5245cb8451aa8
2011-07-15 09:29:05

Ocean acidification, a consequence of climate change, could weaken the shells of California mussels and diminish their body mass, with serious implications for coastal ecosystems, UC Davis researchers will report July 15 in the Journal of Experimental Biology. California mussels (Mytilus californianus) live in beds along the western coast of the United States from Alaska to California. More than 300 other species share the beds or depend on the mussels in some way. "Because these mussels play...

2011-06-15 00:00:29

LiteScape Enters Third Quarter 2011 with 90,000 Plus Seats Deployed, New Strategic Partnerships, RSA Certified Integration LiteScape Technologies, the leading developer of Unified Communications (UC) Applications for Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP)-enabled environments today announced more than 90,000 seats deployed, the signing of strategic partner World Wide Technology, a stronger partnership with Cisco, and the Secure Profile Management (SPM) achieving interoperability certification...

2011-06-14 01:24:25

Lost your keys? Your brain might be in a better state to recall where you put them at some times than at others, according to new research from UC Davis. A paper describing the work is published June 13 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "It's been assumed that the process of retrieving a memory is cued by an external stimulus," said Charan Ranganath, professor at the UC Davis Center for Neuroscience and Department of Psychology. "But we found that the levels of...

2011-04-05 00:14:48

Mexican migrants to the U.S. risk "clinically significant" mental-health problems, study finds Mexicans who migrate to the United States are far more likely to experience significant depression and anxiety than individuals who do not immigrate, a new study published today in the Archives of General Psychiatry, a JAMA Archives journal, has found. The study, "Migration from Mexico to the U.S. and subsequent risk for depressive and anxiety disorders: A cross-national study," was conducted...


Word of the Day
out-herod
  • In the phrase to out-herod Herod, to be more violent than Herod (as represented in the old mystery plays); hence, to exceed in any excess of evil.
Herod refers to 'Herod the Great,' a Roman client king and 'a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis.' According to the OED, the term is 'chiefly with allusion to Shakespeare's use' in Hamlet.
Related