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Last updated on April 16, 2014 at 11:09 EDT

Latest UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center Stories

2008-06-19 12:00:17

By Jane E. Brody To see Barry Cooper working out at the YMCA in Brooklyn, New York, every morning before going to work as a patent lawyer, you would be unlikely to guess that he has cancer. Cooper, 63 and a grandfather of two, is one of a small but growing number of patients for whom once-fatal cancer has become a chronic disease. Through a better understanding of factors that distinguish cancer cells from normal ones and the development of more specific treatments that capitalize on...

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2008-03-18 09:35:00

New scheme holds promise for treating cancer, other diseasesUCLA researchers have developed a feedback control scheme that can search for the most effective drug combinations to treat a variety of conditions, including cancers and infections. The discovery could play a significant role in facilitating new clinical drug-cocktail trials. The best known use of drug cocktails has been in the fight against HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Drug cocktails also have been used to combat several types...

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2008-01-22 11:15:00

System is invisible to the immune system, preventing responseUsing nanotechnology, scientists from UCLA and Northwestern University have developed a localized and controlled drug delivery method that is invisible to the immune system, a discovery that could provide newer and more effective treatments for cancer and other diseases.The study, published Jan. 22, 2008 in the journal ACS Nano, provides an example of the enormous potential and clinical significance that nanomaterials may represent...

2007-10-02 09:01:20

CLEVELAND, Oct. 2 /PRNewswire/ -- For the first time in a comic strip, Funky Winkerbean creator Tom Batiuk has depicted the death of a young wife and mother from the recurrence of breast cancer. Lisa Moore, a major character who is battling breast cancer for a second time, succumbs to the disease on Oct. 4, 2007, leaving behind her husband, Les, and their five-year-old daughter, Summer. As a result of Batiuk's commitment to helping people facing their own real life battles with cancer,...

2006-08-31 13:30:00

By Lisa Richwine WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Genetically altered immune cells wiped out tumors in two men with a deadly form of skin cancer and kept the patients disease-free for at least 18 months, U.S. scientists said on Thursday. Fifteen patients did not respond to the treatment, however, and the researchers and other experts said more work was needed to make it more effective. Still, the findings were welcomed as evidence that cancer patients can be successfully treated using gene therapy, a...

2006-01-12 08:03:21

LONDON (Reuters) - Many British patients suffering from cancer are waiting too long before being seen by a specialist, although referral times have improved over the last five years, a House of Commons committee said on Thursday. Around 40 percent of people ultimately diagnosed with cancer were not referred urgently and were not seen by a specialist within two weeks of referral in 2004, the Public Accounts Committee said in a report. "Cancer patients are being looked after better...

2005-09-20 15:52:26

COLUMBUS, Ohio "“ Researchers have identified a gene mutation that may increase the risk of prostate cancer up to three times in African-American men with a family history of the disease. The study, by scientists at 13 research centers, found that mutations in a gene known as EphB2 occurred in 15 percent of African-American men with a strong family history of prostate cancer. The mutation was found in only 5 percent of African-American men with no family or personal history of the...

2005-08-24 17:51:37

Washington D.C. -- The first clinical trial of a biologic nanoparticle designed to give back to cancer patients the tumor-busting gene they have lost is expected to start in September at Georgetown University Medical Center. The phase I clinical study will enroll 20 patients with advanced solid cancers (including most common tumor types), and is the culmination of more than a decade of work by a team of researchers led by Professor Esther H. Chang, Ph.D. at the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer...

2005-07-18 04:58:59

A product produced by lung cancer tumors fuels the cells that suppress immune function in patients and may be a target for Celebrex therapy, giving oncologists another weapon to fight cancer, according to a study by researchers at UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center. Researchers found that PGE2, which is produced normally by epithelial cells but at very high levels in lung cancer and other malignancies, up-regulates the activity of lymphocytes called T-regulatory cells, which suppress immune...