Quantcast
Last updated on April 23, 2014 at 21:24 EDT

Latest Ultrafine particles Stories

2012-03-15 18:10:00

PULASKI, N.Y., March 15, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Those at greatest risk of cardiovascular disease include the elderly, the very young, persons suffering from any cardio-respiratory problems including high blood pressure, heart disease, vascular issues, & asthma. Additional studies show that filtering air of 0.3 micron particles points strongly to improvements in cardiovascular and respiratory health by significant levels. A team of scientists from Denmark & Sweden discovered that...

2011-12-07 20:34:20

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) spent 75 days on the job carrying out some very important homework–measurements in a "typical dwelling" of the release, distribution and fate of particles almost as tiny as the diameter of a single DNA molecule. Particles ranging in size from 100 nanometers down to 2.5 nanometers that were emitted by gas and electric stoves, hair dryers, power tools and candles were tracked and analyzed. Monitoring such tiny...

2011-08-20 00:00:33

Releases new white paper outlining sources of ultrafine particles, human exposure risks, and regulation initiatives Atlanta, GA (PRWEB) August 18, 2011 Air Quality Sciences, Inc. (AQS) announced today its new service for measuring ultrafine particle (UFP) emissions from indoor sources. UFPs are very small, typically less than 100 nanometers (or about 1/1000th of a human hair). By virtue of their size, UFPs can be inhaled easily and travel deep into the human lung. Health studies indicate a...

2011-07-14 13:16:48

Tiny chemical particles emitted by diesel exhaust fumes could raise the risk of heart attacks, research has shown Tiny chemical particles emitted by diesel exhaust fumes could raise the risk of heart attacks, research has shown. Scientists have found that ultrafine particles produced when diesel burns are harmful to blood vessels and can increase the chances of blood clots forming in arteries, leading to a heart attack or stroke. The research by the University of Edinburgh measured the impact...

3be879fb83ad6673bad042528589e2ee1
2011-03-10 09:51:03

Scientists are untangling how the tiniest pollution particles "“ which we take in with every breath we breathe "“ affect our health, making people more vulnerable to cardiovascular and respiratory problems. While scientists know that air pollution can aggravate heart problems, showing exactly how it does so has been challenging. In a study published recently in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, scientists showed that in people with diabetes, breathing ultrafine...

aab64e66cfed5cd53853ddee869d6a221
2010-09-29 06:25:00

Firefighters are exposed to potentially dangerous levels of ultrafine particulates at the time they are least likely to wear protective breathing equipment. Because of this, researchers believe firefighters may face an increased risk for heart disease from exposures during the fire suppression process. Coronary heart disease is the No. 1 killer of American firefighters, with many of these incidents taking place during or just after a firefighting incident. Researchers say exposure to these...

2010-07-02 19:11:57

UCLA-led study has implications for traffic-related asthma flares A new academic study led by UCLA scientists has found that even brief exposure to ultrafine pollution particles near a Los Angeles freeway is potent enough to boost the allergic inflammation that exacerbates asthma. Published online in the American Journal of Physiology"“Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology in June, the study shows that the tiniest air pollutant particles "• those measuring less than 180...

9bba868b703daf3348eb333ec6bc3a391
2010-02-18 10:27:39

Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, mutagenic aldehydes and particulate matter during pan-frying of beefsteak Frying meat on a gas hob may be more harmful to health than using an electric hob, because of the type of fumes it produces, suggests research published ahead of print in Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Professional chefs and cooks may be particularly at risk. Cooking fumes produced during high temperature frying have recently been classified as "probably...

a762398d2a3c0f8761ac00295a628e001
2009-12-22 10:30:00

The air in some school classrooms may contain higher levels of extremely small particles of pollutants "” easily inhaled deep into the lungs "” than polluted outdoor air, scientists in Australia and Germany are reporting in an article in ACS' semi-monthly journal Environmental Science & Technology. Lidia Morawska and colleagues note increasing concern in recent years over the health effects of airborne ultrafine particles. Evidence suggests that they can be toxic when inhaled...

2009-12-15 22:13:24

The Key Laboratory for Power Machinery and Engineering of M. O. E, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) in Shanghai, showed that the characteristics of ultrafine particles from a compression- ignition engine fueled with low sulfur diesel and evaluated the effects of diesel fuel sulfur on particulate matter from a compression-ignition engine. The study is reported in Volume XX, Issue 23 (December, 2009) of the Chinese Science Bulletin because of its significant research value. Ultrafine...