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Latest Ultramafic rocks Stories

ringwoodite
2014-03-13 07:33:12

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The first terrestrial sample of a water-rich gem that reveals new evidence about the existence of large volumes of water has been discovered by an international team of scientists which was led by University of Alberta's diamond scientist, Graham Pearson. Analysis of the gem, called ringwoodite, reveals that it contains a significant amount of water — 1.5 percent of its own weight. These findings, reported in a recent issue of...

Red Mountain mine
2013-12-07 05:50:16

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Can an abandoned mine help with the fight against global warming? Researchers from Stanford University think so. They have been using an abandoned mine to gain new insights on how to permanently entomb greenhouse gas emissions inside the Earth. The team has spent two years trying to unravel a geological mystery at the Red Mountain mine, located about 70 miles east of the campus. Some of the world's largest veins of pure magnesium...

Earth’s Magma Mantle Melts Hotter Than Previously Thought
2013-01-10 10:10:41

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to a new study by researchers at Rice University, the Earth's mantle magma melts far hotter and deeper in the Earth's core than previously thought, a discovery that will have lasting implications for our understanding of the planet's geophysical and geochemical properties. The research team, led by Rajdeep Dasgupta, put small amounts of peridotite under large pressures in a laboratory to determine that rock can and does...

bc41e46b0aa903a359f97ee11a80c1ba
2010-09-03 14:03:42

Earth today is one of the most active planets in the Solar System, and was probably even more so during the early stages of its life. Thanks to the plate tectonics that continue to shape our planet's surface, remnants of crust from Earth's formative years are rare, but not impossible to find. A paper published in Nature Sept. 2 examines how some ancient rocks have resisted being recycled into Earth's convecting interior. Throughout the world there exist regions of ancient crust, referred to...

6b0e0acd28b9f106a95da03696c78dd81
2009-03-07 08:28:27

6,000 Square Miles in U.S. Might Turn Emissions to Harmless Solids To slow global warming, scientists are exploring ways to pull carbon dioxide from the air and safely lock it away. Trees already do this naturally through photosynthesis; now, in a new report, geologists have mapped large rock formations in the United States that can also absorb CO2, which they say might be artificially harnessed to do the task at a vastly increased pace. The report, by scientists at Columbia University's...

b595ee80d11a3fbf27369f864c1b1708
2008-11-06 12:26:16

Proposed method would speed natural reactions a million times Scientists say that a type of rock found at or near the surface in the Mideast nation of Oman and other areas around the world could be harnessed to soak up huge quantities of globe-warming carbon dioxide. Their studies show that the rock, known as peridotite, reacts naturally at surprisingly high rates with CO2 to form solid minerals"”and that the process could be speeded a million times or more with simple drilling and...

2008-11-06 11:17:47

Freewest Resources Canada Inc. (TSX VENTURE: FWR) (the "Company") is pleased to provide the following update on diamond drilling and other exploration activities on it's wholly-owned McFaulds property (the "Property"). The Property, consisting of 4 mineral claims or 1,036 hectares, comprises one of three properties in which the Company is currently exploring, on its own and in strategic joint-ventures in the emerging "Ring of Fire" metal district. Specifically, the visual results of the...

01c2d2d9240642ecfc8665f2a2b365bc1
2008-10-17 09:20:00

A new technique using X-rays has enabled scientists to play 'detective' and solve the debate about the origins of a three billion year old rock fragment. In the study, published today in the journal Nature, a scientist describes the new technique and shows how it can be used to analyze tiny samples of molten rock called magma, yielding important clues about the Earth's early history. Working in conjunction with Australian and US scientists, an Imperial College London researcher analyzed a...

2008-09-15 09:00:39

Freewest Resources Canada Inc., (TSX VENTURE: FWR) (the "Company") is pleased to announce the preliminary results obtained from early-stage drilling completed on it's 100%-owned McFaulds property. The Property consisting of 4 mineral claims or 1036 hectares, comprises one of three properties in which the Company is currently exploring, on its own and in strategic joint-ventures in the emerging "Ring of Fire" metal district. It is located approximately 300 kilometres north of the town of...


Latest Ultramafic rocks Reference Libraries

28_42121cee4c09c0898f52263bea588d54
2005-05-26 11:26:59

Chromite, iron magnesium chromium oxide: (Fe,Mg)Cr2O4, is an oxide mineral belonging to the spinel group. Magnesium is always present in variable amounts, also aluminium and iron substitute for chromium. Chromite is found in peridotite and other layered ultramafic intrusive rocks and also found in metamorphic rocks such as serpentinites. Ore deposites of chromite form as early magmatic differentiates. It is commonly associated with olivine, magnetite, serpentine, and corundum. Chromite is...

28_3e212d466bb2eed94dd87a3a621c531d
2005-05-25 19:19:16

Peridotite is a dense, coarse grained ultrabasic rock, consisting mainly of the minerals olivine and pyroxene. Peridotite is also a group of mantle derived igneous rocks. They all are ultramafic or ultrabasic meaning they contain less than 45% silica and are high in iron and magnesium. Members of the peridotite family include: Dunite - predominately composed of olivine, with minor enstatite pyroxene and chromite. Harzburgite - composed of olivine, enstatite, and minor chromite....

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Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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