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2012-07-12 13:28:12

John Neumann for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Every kid knows that we taste with our tongues, however those in the know, understand that this is a very rudimentary viewpoint. When it comes to flavor, the tongue is very basic. Most of our experience of flavor comes from our olfactory system: our nose and sinuses. Professor Barry Smith, director of the Centre for the Study of the Senses at the University of London, explains, “Not only is it not just about your tongue. Very...

2012-03-12 19:52:43

Animals live in surprisingly different sensory worlds Scientists from the Monell Center report that seven of 12 related mammalian species have lost the sense of sweet taste. As each of the sweet-blind species eats only meat, the findings demonstrate that a liking for sweets is frequently lost during the evolution of diet specialization. Previous research from the Monell team had revealed the remarkable finding that both domestic and wild cats are unable to taste sweet compounds due to...

2012-02-14 18:00:00

Social Umami leverages Liferay´s out-of-the-box tools to create viral shopping experience Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) February 14, 2012 Liferay, Inc., provider of the world´s leading enterprise-class open source portal, announced today the launch of a new social shopping network by Liferay partner Social Umami that was built on the Liferay platform. Social Umami, which allows users to share their favorite consumer products with friends, is now available in beta at...

2011-08-03 12:18:39

Protein inside taste cells turn off bitter taste New findings may lend insight into why some people are especially sensitive to bitter tastes. Scientists from the Monell Center and Givaudan Flavors have identified a protein inside of taste cells that acts to shorten bitter taste signals. They further report that mice lacking the gene for this taste terminator protein are more sensitive to bitter taste and also find it more aversive, possibly because they experience the taste for a longer...

2011-04-06 21:51:13

Success opens doors extending from health to new taste molecules Following years of futile attempts, new research from the Monell Center demonstrates that living human taste cells can be maintained in culture for at least seven months. The findings provide scientists with a valuable tool to learn about the human sense of taste and how it functions in health and disease. This advance ultimately will assist efforts to prevent and treat taste loss or impairment due to infection, radiation,...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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