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Latest University of Adelaide Stories

2012-03-29 22:14:18

Wait for natural labor, researchers say A University of Adelaide study has revealed that inducing labor in pregnant women when it's not medically necessary is more likely to result in complications at birth. Elective induction is becoming more common around the world, with many women being induced for social and other non-medical reasons. Dr Rosalie Grivell from the University of Adelaide's Robinson Institute has studied the data of more than 28,000 births from across South...

2012-03-15 11:56:33

A salt-tolerant variety of durum wheat that outperforms other varieties by 25 per cent on salty soils has been developed by CSIRO scientists using traditional crop breeding techniques. Researchers have introduced a salt-tolerant gene into a commercial durum wheat which has produced spectacular results in field trials. "Salinity already affects more than 20 per cent of the world´s agricultural soils and is an increasing threat to food production due to climate change," CSIRO's Dr...

2012-03-13 21:41:06

A major study led by the University of Adelaide has found that women who have had one prior cesarean can lower the risk of death and serious complications for their next baby - and themselves - by electing to have another cesarean. The study, known as the Birth After Caesarean (BAC) study, is the first of its kind in the world. It involves more than 2300 women and their babies and 14 Australian maternity hospitals. The results are published this week in the international journal, PLoS...

2012-03-12 09:55:40

A team of Australian scientists has bred salt tolerance into a variety of durum wheat that shows improved grain yield by 25% on salty soils. Using 'non-GM' crop breeding techniques, scientists from CSIRO Plant Industry have introduced a salt-tolerant gene into a commercial durum wheat, with spectacular results shown in field tests. Researchers at the University of Adelaide's Waite Research Institute have led the effort to understand how the gene delivers salinity tolerance to the plants....

Image 1 - Ancient DNA Holds Clues To Climate Change Adaptation
2012-02-01 08:49:00

Thirty-thousand-year-old bison bones discovered in permafrost at a Canadian goldmine are helping scientists unravel the mystery about how animals adapt to rapid environmental change. The bones play a key role in a world-first study, led by University of Adelaide researchers, which analyses special genetic modifications that turn genes on and off, without altering the DNA sequence itself. These 'epigenetic' changes can occur rapidly between generations — without requiring the time for...

Image 1 - 100's Of Threatened Species Not On Official US List
2011-12-14 03:54:16

Many of the animal species at risk of extinction in the United States have not made it onto the country's official Endangered Species Act (ESA) list, according to new research from the University of Adelaide. National "red lists" are used by many countries to evaluate and protect locally threatened species. The ESA is one of the best known national lists and arguably the world's most effective biodiversity protection law. A study - now published in Conservation Letters - has compared...

Oldest Super Predator Had Highly-acute Vision
2011-12-08 06:25:03

Paleontologists working on fossils from Kangaroo Island in South Australia have discovered that the Earth's first apex predator had highly acute vision that rivaled or exceeded that of most living insects and crustaceans. The researchers from South Australian Museum and University of Adelaide discovered exceptionally preserved fossil eyes of the top predator in the Cambrian ocean from over 500 million years ago: the fearsome Anomalocaris. The species is considered to be at the top of...

2011-11-30 14:53:11

A University of Adelaide scientist says much more could be done to predict the likelihood and spread of serious disease - such as tuberculosis (TB) or foot-and-mouth disease - in Australian wildlife and commercial stock. Professor Corey Bradshaw and colleagues have evaluated freely available software tools that provide a realistic prediction of the spread of disease among animals. They used a combination of models to look at the possible spread of TB among feral water buffalo in the...

2011-10-05 15:16:52

A new study from the University of Adelaide shows the parents of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are more likely to have some form of cardiovascular disease. PCOS is a hormonal disorder affecting about 10% of women of reproductive age. It is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women and a leading cause of infertility. The study shows mothers of women with PCOS are more likely to have any form of cardiovascular disease, and almost twice as likely to have high blood...

Drunken Behavior The Fault Of Our Immune System
2011-09-29 08:50:50

Researchers from the University of Adelaide are finding out that how your body responds to alcohol is strongly tied to the reaction of immune cells in your brain. Some well-known reactions to alcohol include impaired ability to control the muscles involved in walking and talking. “It´s amazing to think that despite 10,000 years of using alcohol, and several decades of investigation into the way that alcohol affects the nerve cells in our brain, we are still trying to figure out...