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Latest University of Adelaide Stories

2012-05-09 09:30:43

Researchers from the University of Adelaide are hoping to better understand why the mutated genes for breast and ovarian cancer are not passed on more frequently from one generation of women to the next. That's despite a documented link between breast cancer genes and increased fertility in women. Dr Jack da Silva from the University's School of Molecular & Biomedical Science says that because women who carry breast cancer genes are more fertile, in theory they have a greater chance...

2012-05-07 09:14:59

A University of Adelaide study has identified the risk of major birth defects associated with different types of assisted reproductive technology. In the most comprehensive study of its kind in the world, researchers from the University's Robinson Institute have compared the risk of major birth defects for each of the reproductive therapies commonly available internationally, such as: IVF (in vitro fertilization), ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection) and ovulation induction. They also...

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2012-05-06 07:30:20

Fertility injections used to help overcome male reproductive issues could increase the risks of birth defects in the children they sire, a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has discovered. The study, which was led by researchers at the University of Adelaide's Robson Institute, examined a total of 308,000 South Australian births over an 18-year period, and discovered that children born as a result of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) were more likely...

Pollen Can Protect Mahogany From Extinction
2012-04-04 03:28:58

New research from the University of Adelaide could help protect one of the world's most globally threatened tree species - the big leaf mahogany - from extinction. Big leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) is the most prized mahogany timber around the world. It is at risk of extinction in its native habitats because of the timber trade, particularly in Central and South America. To better understand how such a threatened species can be brought back from the brink of extinction,...

2012-03-29 22:14:18

Wait for natural labor, researchers say A University of Adelaide study has revealed that inducing labor in pregnant women when it's not medically necessary is more likely to result in complications at birth. Elective induction is becoming more common around the world, with many women being induced for social and other non-medical reasons. Dr Rosalie Grivell from the University of Adelaide's Robinson Institute has studied the data of more than 28,000 births from across South...

2012-03-15 11:56:33

A salt-tolerant variety of durum wheat that outperforms other varieties by 25 per cent on salty soils has been developed by CSIRO scientists using traditional crop breeding techniques. Researchers have introduced a salt-tolerant gene into a commercial durum wheat which has produced spectacular results in field trials. "Salinity already affects more than 20 per cent of the world´s agricultural soils and is an increasing threat to food production due to climate change," CSIRO's Dr...

2012-03-13 21:41:06

A major study led by the University of Adelaide has found that women who have had one prior cesarean can lower the risk of death and serious complications for their next baby - and themselves - by electing to have another cesarean. The study, known as the Birth After Caesarean (BAC) study, is the first of its kind in the world. It involves more than 2300 women and their babies and 14 Australian maternity hospitals. The results are published this week in the international journal, PLoS...

2012-03-12 09:55:40

A team of Australian scientists has bred salt tolerance into a variety of durum wheat that shows improved grain yield by 25% on salty soils. Using 'non-GM' crop breeding techniques, scientists from CSIRO Plant Industry have introduced a salt-tolerant gene into a commercial durum wheat, with spectacular results shown in field tests. Researchers at the University of Adelaide's Waite Research Institute have led the effort to understand how the gene delivers salinity tolerance to the plants....

Image 1 - Ancient DNA Holds Clues To Climate Change Adaptation
2012-02-01 08:49:00

Thirty-thousand-year-old bison bones discovered in permafrost at a Canadian goldmine are helping scientists unravel the mystery about how animals adapt to rapid environmental change. The bones play a key role in a world-first study, led by University of Adelaide researchers, which analyses special genetic modifications that turn genes on and off, without altering the DNA sequence itself. These 'epigenetic' changes can occur rapidly between generations — without requiring the time for...

Image 1 - 100's Of Threatened Species Not On Official US List
2011-12-14 03:54:16

Many of the animal species at risk of extinction in the United States have not made it onto the country's official Endangered Species Act (ESA) list, according to new research from the University of Adelaide. National "red lists" are used by many countries to evaluate and protect locally threatened species. The ESA is one of the best known national lists and arguably the world's most effective biodiversity protection law. A study - now published in Conservation Letters - has compared...


Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.