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Latest University of Alabama at Birmingham Stories

2011-05-19 13:53:41

In the first head-to-head comparison of the three most common drugs used at the time of a kidney transplant to prevent organ rejection, researchers found that the least expensive drug "“ at one-half to one-fifth the price "“ is as safe and effective as the other two, according to a paper published by University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers in the May 19, 2011, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Based at UAB, researchers in the INTAC trial spent three years...

2011-05-03 13:19:48

An antioxidant may prevent damage to the liver caused by excessive alcohol, according to new research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. The findings, published online April 21, 2011, in the journal Hepatology, may point the way to treatments to reverse steatosis, or fatty deposits in the liver that can lead to cirrhosis and cancer. The research team, led by Victor Darley-Usmar, Ph.D., professor of pathology at UAB, introduced an antioxidant called mitochondria-targeted ubiquinone,...

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2011-04-07 14:40:00

Astronauts anticipate more trips to the moon and manned missions to Mars. But exposure to cosmic radiation outside the Earth's magnetic field could be detrimental to their arteries, according to a study by University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers published April 6, 2011, online in the journal Radiation Research. Using an animal model, researchers assessed the affect of iron ion radiation commonly found in outer space to see if exposures promoted the development of atherosclerosis, as...

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2011-04-01 08:15:28

A team of scientists in the United Kingdom and the United States has warned that the native fauna and unique ecology of the Southern Ocean, the vast body of water that surrounds the Antarctic continent, is under threat from human activity. Their study is published this week in the peer-reviewed journal Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. "Although  Antarctica is still the most pristine environment on Earth, its marine ecosystems are being degraded through the introduction of...

2011-03-30 13:40:51

Gliomas are brain invaders. A kind of malignant tumor cell, gliomas branch out like tendrils from a central tumor source, spreading cancer throughout the brain. Traditional therapies, such as cutting out the tumor surgically, can be ineffective if the cells have already spread. Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham may have come upon a way to stop a glioma invasion in its tracks, using a drug already approved for use in Europe. Much like early explorers of the Old West...

2011-03-10 09:11:00

BIRMINGHAM, Ala., March 10, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- PNP Therapeutics, Inc. -- an early-stage Birmingham-based biopharmaceutical company created from research conducted at Southern Research Institute and The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) -- today announced that several major objectives have been reached in the development of its therapeutic technology platform and proprietary products for the treatment of cancer. "A number of important regulatory and financial efforts came to...

2010-12-13 13:08:56

University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have pinpointed a protein that compromises the kidney's filtering ability, causing nephrotic syndrome, and demonstrated that a naturally occurring precursor of an acid in the body offers potential for treating some forms of the condition. The research was published online Dec. 12 in Nature Medicine. "This is a major breakthrough in understanding the development and treatment of kidney disease associated with proteinuria, the leakage of protein...

2010-11-25 08:14:40

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Fighting obesity may not be as clear cut as eating right and exercising. A recent study conducted at the University of Alabama at Birmingham demonstrates that there is much more to the obesity epidemic than meets the eye. Led by biostatistics professor David B. Allison, Ph.D., the study began with the analysis of previous data about little primates called marmosets, which was collected at the Wisconsin Non-Human Primate Center.  The population had gradually...

2010-11-24 10:03:47

So, why are we fat? And getting fatter? Most people would say it's simple: We eat too much and exercise too little. But University of Alabama at Birmingham obesity researcher David B. Allison, Ph.D., says that answer, while valid, may be a little too simple. Allison and colleagues think the more relevant question is this: Why do we eat too much and expend too little energy? And like good detectives, they've set out to identify a suspect, or suspects, that may be contributing to the obesity...

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2010-11-18 06:25:00

A quick blast of radio waves to the nerves of the kidneys can help control high blood pressure in patients who do not respond to conventional treatment, researchers reported on Wednesday. The device works by selectively severing nerves leading to the kidney that play a key role in regulating blood pressure. In the study, the radio waves effectively lowered the top blood pressure reading by an average of 32 points after just six months, versus no change in those who took the best available...


Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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