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Latest University of Alaska Fairbanks Stories

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2010-06-22 09:50:00

Tracking fish across Alaska's vast continental shelves can present a challenge to any scientist studying Alaska's seas. Researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks have successfully tested a possible solution in the form of underwater gliders. Last month, Peter Winsor, associate professor of physical oceanography, and Andrew Seitz, assistant professor of fisheries, tested the use of autonomous underwater vehicles, called gliders, for tracking tagged fish. Winsor and Seitz suspended...

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2010-01-26 08:55:00

Boys face high rates of a variety of mental health issues, in addition to lagging behind girls in academic performance and college attendance, according to two new papers by University of Alaska Fairbanks researcher Judith Kleinfeld. The studies, recently published in the journal Gender Issues, note that boys have higher rates of suicide, conduct disorders, emotional disturbance, premature death and juvenile delinquency than their female peers, as well as lower grades, test scores and college...

2009-09-11 10:52:27

Much of circumpolar Arctic research focuses on the physical, direct changes resulting from climate warming such as sea ice retreat and temperature increases. "What's understudied is the living component of the Arctic and that includes humans," said Syndonia "Donie" Bret-Harte, associate professor of biology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and co-author of a paper to be published September 11, 2009 in the journal Science. The paper reviews current knowledge on the ecological consequences...

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2009-08-24 13:30:21

A marine scientist said Alaska's $4.6 billion fishing industry might be in danger because marine waters in the area are turning acidic from absorbing greenhouse gases faster than tropical waters, The Associated Press reported. Jeremy Mathis, a chemical oceanographer at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, said the same things that make Alaska's marine waters among the most productive in the world - cold, shallow depths and abundant marine life "“ also make them the most vulnerable to...

2009-06-17 09:50:00

Two University of the Alaska Fairbanks researchers are among key contributors to a new national report that details visible effects of climate change in the United States and how today's choices stand to affect the future.The report, "Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States," is the first to focus on observed and projected climate change and its effects specifically in the United States. UAF scientists A. David McGuire and John Walsh were part of a consortium of experts from 13...

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2009-04-17 09:45:57

A newly released study by researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks offers evidence that in one breed of northern seabird, the size of males' feather crests may be more than simple ornamentation. Their study, published this month in of the Journal of Comparative Physiology B, shows that crest size may be a physical indicator of a male crested auklet's quality as a mate. Scientists have long noted that female auklets prefer males with larger crests. But until recently, they did not...

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2009-02-04 08:40:00

Climate change seems to have no effect on Argentina's huge Perito Moreno glacier, which is flourishing despite the global warming that is melting others around it. Though the majority of the world's glaciers are thawing away from the warmer temperatures, scientists announced that the Perito Moreno ice field, called "The White Giant," is growing 10 feet daily from deep snowfalls in the Patagonia area. "Glaciers don't respond solely to temperature changes," Martin Stuefer, a Patagonian expert...

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2008-12-17 14:51:27

Three Alaska volcanoes erupted in midsummer 2008. Cleveland, Okmok and Kasatochi volcanoes, all located in Alaska's Aleutian Chain, made for a hectic 20th anniversary for the Alaska Volcano Observatory. Scientists from AVO and the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks will share details of their research on North Pacific volcanoes, highlighting some of the recent volcanic eruptions in Alaska, at a variety of presentations at the American Geophysical Union's fall meeting...

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2008-10-08 12:12:34

Frozen arctic soil contains nearly twice the greenhouse-gas-producing organic material as was previously estimated, according to recently published research by University of Alaska Fairbanks scientists. School of Natural Resources & Agricultural Sciences professor Chien-Lu Ping published his latest findings on the Nature Geoscience and Scientific American Web sites. Wielding jackhammers, Ping and a team of scientists dug down more than one meter into the permafrost to take soil samples...

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2008-06-04 09:42:53

High altitude balloon exceeds 18 vertical miles during flightThe Alaska Space Grant Program and the Arctic Amateur Radio Club formed the Balloon Experiment And Research Program"”or B.E.A.R. for short"”in December 2007. The program's aim was to launch a high altitude balloon equipped with two amateur radio signals and more from Poker Flat Research Range in the spring of 2008. On May 10, BEAR participants met to inflate and launch their first balloon. It flew as high as 95,327 feet...


Word of the Day
cacodemon
  • An evil spirit; a devil.
  • A nightmare.
  • In astrology, the twelfth house of a scheme or figure of the heavens: so called from its signifying dreadful things, such as secret enemies, great losses, imprisonment, etc.
'Cacodemon' comes from a Greek term meaning 'evil genius.'
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