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Latest University of Alberta Stories

2010-08-04 16:08:21

Lower income families can't afford registration fees; don't qualify for minimum income levels When it comes to who gets the biggest bang for the buck from Canada's Children's Fitness Tax Credit (CFTC), it's wealthier families that benefit most, University of Alberta researchers have found. It's the first study to look at the uptake and effectiveness of a tax credit to increase physical activity levels of children. Behavioural scientist John Spence, and a team of researchers in the Faculty of...

2010-07-22 15:10:41

Children with celiac disease need to include certain must-have vitamins in their diets to stave off weak bones and osteoporosis, say researchers at the University of Alberta. A study of 43 children and teens from three to 18 years of age diagnosed with celiac disease showed that they also tended to have low bone density, likely due to poor intake and absorption of vitamins and minerals. That means they should be getting more of bone-boosting vitamins such as K and D in their diets, says Diana...

2010-07-22 01:12:58

University of Alberta research has discovered heart failure patients with more muscle have the potential to increase their length of life. Antigone Oreopoulos, a researcher from the U of A's School of Public Health, studied 140 patients with heart failure. Study participants underwent a special scan to measure their muscle mass and body fat. Oreopoulos' research found that having more muscle was associated with better nutritional status and lower severity of heart failure, while higher body...

2010-06-25 15:14:03

A University of Alberta research team has discovered that a plant's strategy to capture nutrients in the soil is the result of integration of different types of information. U of A ecologist J.C. Cahill says the plant's strategy mirrors the daily risk-versus-reward dilemmas that animals experience in their quest for food. Biologists established long ago that an animal uses information about both the location of a food supply and potential competitors to determine an optimal foraging strategy....

2010-06-22 14:37:17

A team of researchers from the University of Alberta and the National Institute for Nanotechnology has extended the operating life of an unsealed plastic solar cell, from mere hours to eight months. The research groups' development of an inexpensive, readily available plastic solar cell technology hit a wall because of a chemical leeching problem within the body of the prototype. A chemical coating on an electrode was unstable and migrated through the circuitry of the cell. The team led by U...

2010-06-15 15:38:42

You wouldn't think that there would be much similarity between a hockey line and an automobile assembly line. However, University of Alberta management-science researcher Ken Schultz says that both groups can learn something about line design and human behavior, which may help them perform better. Schultz, who recently published an article in Management Science, analyzed production-line data from a General Motors plant and identified that there seemed to be a shift in how fast the task was...

2010-05-28 14:07:25

A University of Alberta researcher says people generally do not act on information about the effects fossil fuel-based products are having on the environment. And the reason, says English and film studies researcher Imre Szeman, is because of the way discussions on environmental issues are structured. In a recently published study, Szeman says the main assumption among scientists"”that with knowledge comes behavioural change"”is proving to be an ineffective premise in dealing with...

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2010-05-25 13:11:56

A new study has found that climate change will trigger a dramatic and sudden decline in the number of polar bears. The research is the first to directly model how changing climate will affect polar bear reproduction and survival. Based on what is understood about a polar bear's physiology, behavior and ecology, the study predicts that pregnancy rates will fall and fewer bears will survive fasting during longer ice-free seasons. These changes will take place suddenly as bears pass a...

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2010-05-22 09:05:00

Pressure treated wooden playground structures don't live up to bad reputation Pressure treated wooden playground structures do not live up to the bad reputation they have earned as being harmful to children, findings of a new University of Alberta study have discovered. Chromated copper arsenate-treated wood became the center of attention in the late 1990s when it was said that arsenic levels in this wood are harmful to children. Around 70 percent of playgrounds in North America are said to...

2010-05-13 10:39:55

Medical Researchers at the University of Alberta reported today evidence that the orphan generic drug Dichloroacetate (DCA) may hold promise as potential therapy for perhaps the deadliest of all human cancers: a form of brain cancer called glioblastoma. The report was published May 12 in the journal Science Translational Medicine, a journal of the American Association of the Advancement of Science. In 2007 the U of A team led by Dr. Evangelos Michelakis, published evidence that DCA reverses...


Word of the Day
penuche
  • A fudgelike confection of brown sugar, cream or milk, and chopped nuts.
'Penuche' is a variant of 'panocha,' a coarse grade of sugar made in Mexico. 'Panocha' probably comes from the Spanish 'panoja, panocha,' ear of grain.
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