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New Study Shows Impact Of Movies On Dog Breed Popularity

New Study Shows Impact Of Movies On Dog Breed Popularity

Hannah Johnson, University of Bristol The effect of movies featuring dogs on the popularity of dog breeds can last up to ten years and is correlated with the general success of the movies, according to new research from the University of...

Latest University of Bristol Stories

Is The Fossil Record Too Incomplete?
2014-09-04 03:17:32

University of Bristol Do all the millions of fossils in museums around the world give a balanced view of the history of life, or is the record too incomplete to be sure? This question was first recognized by Charles Darwin and has worried scientists ever since. Methods have been developed to try to identify and correct for bias in the fossil record but new research from the Universities of Bristol and Bath, suggests many of these correction methods may actually be misleading. The...

marine crocodilian
2014-08-23 03:00:34

Hannah Johnson, University of Bristol The ancestors of today's crocodiles colonized the seas during warm phases and became extinct during cold phases, according to a new Anglo-French study which establishes a link between marine crocodilian diversity and the evolution of sea temperature over a period of more than 140 million years. The research, led by Dr. Jeremy Martin from the Université de Lyon, France and formerly from the University of Bristol, UK is published this week in Nature...

Swimming Behaviors Of Triassic Sea Creatures Identified Based On Paddle Print Fossils
2014-06-12 07:48:30

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Earth is full of evidence that dinosaurs once walked our planet. From fossil fuels to fossils themselves, the dinosaurs left their mark. These prehistoric creatures also left their footprints. Footprints can be found from Texas to China, tantalizing the imagination of the public and researchers alike. Such tracks have been found in an ancient seabed in China that, according to an international research team from the University of...

2014-06-11 09:44:35

University of Bristol Wireless data connections that exploit millimetre wave radio spectrum (30GHz to 300GHz) are expected to be used in worldwide 5G networks from 2020. The University of Bristol's Communication Systems and Networks research group has partnered with Bristol start-up Blu Wireless Technology (BWT) to develop this technology and they will demonstrate their innovative work at the Small Cells World Summit in London this week [10-12 June]. Millimetre wave radios use much...

2014-04-23 09:30:59

Neuroscientists have discovered a brain pathway that underlies the emotional behaviors critical for survival. New research by the University of Bristol, published in the Journal of Physiology today [23 April], has identified a chain of neural connections which links central survival circuits to the spinal cord, causing the body to freeze when experiencing fear. Understanding how these central neural pathways work is a fundamental step towards developing effective treatments for...

2014-04-11 12:09:08

With over one billion people in the world living on less than $1.25 per day, the World Bank aims to end ‘extreme poverty’ by 2030. But new research suggests that global poverty figures could be underestimated by up to a third, and calls for more robust measurement in the future. The World Bank figures are widely used by the international community and play a significant role in international strategies to reduce poverty. Critics argue that its estimates are flawed because the ‘dollar...

2014-04-09 16:34:00

The most comprehensive study ever to be carried out into adoption in England has confirmed that the rate of breakdown is lower than anticipated, but it also reveals a stark picture of the problems faced by families. Researchers from the University of Bristol analyzed national data on 37,335 adoptions over a 12 year period to show that 3.2 per cent of children – around three in 100 - move out of their adoptive home prematurely, known as a ‘disruption’. Adoptions were more likely to...

2014-04-07 10:53:15

Scientific uncertainty has been described as a 'monster' that prevents understanding and delays mitigative action in response to climate change. New research by Professor Stephan Lewandowsky of the University of Bristol, and international colleagues, shows that uncertainty should make us more rather than less concerned about climate change. In two companion papers, published today in Climatic Change, the researchers investigated the mathematics of uncertainty in the climate system and...

2014-02-11 10:58:55

New research has revealed a previously unknown mechanism in the body which regulates a hormone that is crucial for motivation, stress responses and control of blood pressure, pain and appetite. The breakthrough could be used to design drugs to help fight health problems connected with these functions in the future. Researchers at the University of Bristol and University College London found that lactate – essentially lactic acid – causes cells in the brain to release more noradrenaline...

2014-01-22 12:28:58

Scientists have identified a channel present in many pain detecting sensory neurons that acts as a 'brake', limiting spontaneous pain. It is hoped that the new research, published today [22 January] in the Journal of Neuroscience, will ultimately contribute to new pain relief treatments. Spontaneous pain is ongoing pathological pain that occurs constantly (slow burning pain) or intermittently (sharp shooting pain) without any obvious immediate cause or trigger. The slow burning pain is the...


Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.