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Novel Method Can Hack Popular Apps With Up To A 92 Percent

Novel Method Can Hack Popular Apps With Up To A 92 Percent Success Rate

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A new security vulnerability in mobile operating systems could allow hackers to gain access to a user’s personal information with a surprising success rate, researchers from the...

Latest University of California, Riverside Stories

2014-02-17 23:24:10

A study conducted with UCR Baseball Team demonstrates that Carrot Neurotechnology Inc.'s interactive vision training game ULTIMEYES® produces improved vision and quantifiable real world benefits. Calabasas, CA (PRWEB) February 17, 2014 Carrot Neurotechnology, Inc. today announced that the peer-reviewed journal Current Biology published the results of a study entitled “Improved vision and on-field performance in baseball through perceptual learning,” in the February 17th...

2014-01-31 11:00:27

UC Riverside-led study shows third-hand smoke causes hyperactivity and significant damage in liver, lung; delays healing of wounds Do not smoke and do not allow yourself to be exposed to smoke because second-hand smoke and third-hand smoke are just as deadly as first-hand smoke, says a scientist at the University of California, Riverside who, along with colleagues, conducted the first animal study of the effects of third-hand smoke. While first-hand smoke refers to the smoke inhaled by...

2014-01-20 23:03:42

Professor Matt Barth, director of the University of California at Riverside’s (UCR) Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) recently spoke with Sean Reynolds of Energy Independence Magazine about their “New Smart Grid” project scheduled for construction this fall. The solar test bed system will be built on the campus of the Bourns Electronics’ research facility in Riverside and will include photovoltaics, energy storage, and electric transportation. Riverside, CA...

Building Smaller, More Powerful And Energy Efficient Batteries
2013-11-19 07:06:09

University of California, Riverside By creating nanoparticles with controlled shape, engineers believe smaller, more powerful and energy efficient batteries can be built Batteries that power electric cars have problems. They take a long time to charge. The charge doesn’t hold long enough to drive long distances. They don’t allow drivers to quickly accelerate. They are big and bulky. Researchers at the University of California, Riverside’s Bourns College of Engineering have...

2013-10-30 11:04:57

UCR psychologist finds that unrealistic pessimists less likely to take preventive action after receiving good news Patients who are unrealistically optimistic about their personal health risks are more likely to take preventive action when confronted with news that is worse than expected, while unrealistic pessimists are less likely to change their behavior after receiving feedback that is better than expected, according to researchers at the University of California, Riverside and Grand...

Toxic Ocean Conditions During Ancient Extinction Event Analyzed
2013-10-30 04:24:55

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Toxic oxygen-free and hydrogen sulfide-rich ocean conditions that existed during a major extinction event nearly 94 million years ago could repeat themselves in the future, according to new research being published online this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Research, led by biogeochemists at the University of California, Riverside, suggests that the previous estimates of these oxygen-free,...

Selenium Kills Honey Bees
2013-10-04 08:46:39

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Selenium, a chemical element that is both naturally occurring and often found near mining and industrial activities, can delay the development of or even kill honey bees, according to new research in the October issue of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. Researchers from the University of California, Riverside found that the four primary forms of the anthropogenic pollutant - selenate, selenite, methylselenocysteine and...

DEET Alternatives Of The Future
2013-10-03 04:27:36

[ Watch the Video: UC Riverside Research Team Identifies DEET Receptors ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online In research that could lead to the development of a safer alternative to the DEET, scientists from the University of California, Riverside have discovered the olfactory receptors used by insects to sense the repellant. While experts have long known that bugs are repelled by DEET (also known as N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide), UC-Riverside associate professor of...

Researchers Create 'Window' To The Brain
2013-09-03 08:41:40

University of California - Riverside University of California, Riverside researchers develop novel transparent skull implant that could provide new treatment options for disorders such as brain cancer and traumatic brain injury A team of University of California, Riverside researchers have developed a novel transparent skull implant that literally provides a "window to the brain", which they hope will eventually open new treatment options for patients with life-threatening neurological...

Newly Discovered Wasp Named After UC Riverside
2013-05-07 12:13:16

University of California - Riverside Serguei Triapitsyn discovered the wasp from the Russian Far East, and named it Gonatocerus ucri An entomologist at the University of California, Riverside discovered a new wasp species in Russia and named it after the university, commonly abbreviated as UCR. Serguei V. Triapitsyn, principal museum scientist at the Entomology Research Museum on campus, had been sorting wasps from the Russian Far East, when he discovered several tiny female...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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