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Latest University of California, Riverside Stories

2010-08-05 15:43:53

UC Riverside study finds that we sound like the people we talk with, even when we can't hear them Humans are incessant imitators. We unintentionally imitate subtle aspects of each other's mannerisms, postures and facial expressions. We also imitate each other's speech patterns, including inflections, talking speed and speaking style. Sometimes, we even take on the foreign accent of the person to whom we're talking, leading to embarrassing consequences. New research by the University of...

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2010-05-13 13:43:43

UC Riverside biologists say young male crickets grow larger in the presence of sexually mature adult male crickets In the animal kingdom, sexual signals often are manifested as displays of bright coloration or, in the case of crickets, as loud song. Adult male crickets produce loud song to attract females, but the song, which permeates the environment, can be overheard also by unintended receivers - such as young males unable to produce song due to a mutation they carry. Until now researchers...

2010-04-07 10:59:00

IRVINE, Calif., April 7 /PRNewswire/ -- "Sustainable" is a hot word right now, but what does it really mean? In Southern California we face many challenges to creating a sustainable world, and understanding those challenges is the first step toward sustainable living. The Orange County Great Park Natural History Lecture Series offers new insights into our Southern Californian environment and ecosystem, delivered by experts in a relatable format. The free lectures begin April 8th and run...

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2010-02-19 15:07:30

Discovery could lead to new drugs for combating spread of deadly disease Malaria remains one of the most deadly infectious diseases. Yet, how Plasmodium, the malaria parasite, regulates its infectious cycle has remained an enigma despite decades of rigorous research. But now a team led by a cell biologist at the University of California, Riverside has identified a mechanism by which Plasmodium intensively replicates itself in human blood to spread the disease. "If this mechanism can be...

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2009-11-19 08:11:32

Junior professor's breakthrough launches unprecedented number of publications in high-profile journals Breakthrough research done earlier this year by a plant cell biologist at the University of California, Riverside has greatly accelerated scientists' knowledge on how plants and crops can survive difficult environmental conditions such as drought. Working on abscisic acid (ABA), a stress hormone produced naturally by plants, Sean Cutler's laboratory showed in April 2009 how ABA helps plants...

2009-11-13 13:30:30

Societal and technological changes have taken place at a dizzying pace over recent decades. A new cross-cultural study aimed to determine whether these dramatic changes have had an effect on the thinking skills that are learned over the course of childhood. The study, by researchers at the University of California, Riverside, and Pitzer College, is published in the November/December 2009 issue of the journal Child Development. Using previously collected data from the late 1970s, the...

2009-10-30 10:25:55

Discovery Has Potential to Make Renewable Fuel Production More Efficient and Economical A team of researchers led by University of California, Riverside (UCR) Professor of Chemical Engineering Wilfred Chen has constructed for the first time a synthetic cellulosome in yeast, which is much more ethanol-tolerant than the bacteria in which these structures are normally found. The yeast cellulosome could enable efficient one-step "consolidated bioprocessing" by maximizing the catalytic efficiency...

2009-10-30 09:19:10

A UC Riverside-led study reports on the effects of biological oxygen production nearly 100 million years before oxygen accumulated in the atmosphere Scientists widely accept that around 2.4 billion years ago, the Earth's atmosphere underwent a dramatic change when oxygen levels rose sharply. Called the "Great Oxidation Event" (GOE), the oxygen spike marks an important milestone in Earth's history, the transformation from an oxygen-poor atmosphere to an oxygen-rich one paving the way for...

2009-10-22 14:37:15

Guy Bertrand's lab shows metal-free 'abnormal N-heterocyclic carbenes' are stable, allowing their use in numerous catalytic chemical reactions Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have successfully created in the laboratory a class of carbenes, highly reactive molecules, used to make catalysts "“ substances that facilitate chemical reactions. Until now, chemists believed these carbenes, called "abnormal N-heterocyclic carbenes" or aNHCs, were impossible to make....

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2009-10-14 09:18:15

Map also facilitates genetic improvement of several other legumes Cowpea, a protein-rich legume crop, is immensely important in many parts of the world, particularly drought-prone regions of Africa and Asia, where it plays a central role in the diet and economy of hundreds of millions of people. Cowpea provides food that complements starchy staple crops such as corn, cassava, sorghum and millets to offer a well-rounded diet, much as beans and other grain legumes complement maize- and...


Word of the Day
Cthulhu
  • A gigantic fictional humanoid alien god being described with a head resembling an octopus and dragon wings and claws, around whom an insane cult developed.
  • Pertaining to the mythos of Cthulhu and additional otherworldly beings created by H. P. Lovecraft or inspired by his writings and imitators.
This word was invented in 1926 by H.P. Lovecraft for his short story, 'The Call of Cthulhu.' 'Cthulhu' may be based on the word 'chthonic,' which in Greek mythology refers to the underworld.
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