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Latest University of California, San Diego Stories

2011-01-07 11:15:29

Babies, even those too young to talk, can understand many of the words that adults are saying "“ and their brains process them in a grown-up way. Combining the cutting-edge technologies of MRI and MEG, scientists at the University of California, San Diego show that babies just over a year old process words they hear with the same brain structures as adults, and in the same amount of time. Moreover, the researchers found that babies were not merely processing the words as sounds, but...

2011-01-05 07:00:00

SAN DIEGO, Jan. 5, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- BioMed Realty Trust, Inc. (NYSE: BMR) announced that it has acquired a life science research and development facility at 3525 John Hopkins Court comprising approximately 48,300 square feet in the Torrey Pines submarket of San Diego, California. The building is 100% leased until 2018 to the University of California, San Diego, a world renowned public research university. BioMed purchased the property for approximately $24.9 million, excluding...

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2010-12-16 13:35:00

UC San Diego study suggests link between sudden infant death and alcohol Not a happy holiday thought, but an important one: The number of babies who die of SIDS, or sudden infant death syndrome, surges by 33 percent on New Year's Day. The suspected reason? Alcohol consumption by caretakers the night before. Led by sociologist David Phillips of the University of California, San Diego, the study documenting the dramatic rise in SIDS deaths on New Year's is published in the journal Addiction....

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2010-12-15 16:41:33

Red tides and similar blooms can render some seafood unsafe to eat, though it can be difficult to tell whether a particular batch harbors toxins that cause food poisoning.A new kind of marker developed by chemists at the University of California, San Diego, and reported in the journal ChemComm makes it easier to see if shellfish are filled with toxin-producing organisms.Mussels and oysters accumulate single-celled marine creatures called dinoflagellates in their digestive systems as they...

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2010-12-15 08:25:00

Research uncovers secrets of strange mollusk and its use of light as a possible defense mechanism Two scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have provided the first details about the mysterious flashes of dazzling bioluminescent light produced by a little-known sea snail. Dimitri Deheyn and Nerida Wilson of Scripps Oceanography (Wilson is now at the Australian Museum in Sydney) studied a species of "clusterwink snail," a small marine snail typically found in tight...

2010-12-07 14:04:04

Bioengineers from the University of California, San Diego developed an explanation for why some types of neurons die sooner than others in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. These insights, published in the journal Nature Biotechnology on November 21, come from detailed models of brain energy metabolism developed in the Department of Bioengineering at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. The Alzheimer's insights demonstrate how fundamental insights on human metabolism...

2010-12-06 12:21:52

Astronomers have traced the waxing and waning light of exploding stars more closely than ever before and seen patterns that aren't yet accounted for in our current understanding of how these eruptions occur. Using data from a sensitive instrument aboard a satellite that images the entire sky every 102 minutes, they studied four of these stars, or novae, that exploded so violently their light would have been visible without a telescope and measured their brightness over the course of the...

2010-11-30 16:26:30

The fragile regions in mammalian genomes thought to play a key role in evolution go through a 'birth and death' process The fragile regions in mammalian genomes that are thought to play a key role in evolution go through a "birth and death" process, according to new bioinformatics research performed at the University of California, San Diego. The new work, published in the journal Genome Biology on November 30, could help researchers identify the current fragile regions in the human genome...

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2010-11-26 09:15:31

University of California - San Diego electrical engineers developed ultra compact, low power pulse compressor on a silicon chip Electrical engineers generated short, powerful light pulses on a chip "“ an important step toward the optical interconnects that will likely replace the copper wires that carry information between chips within today's computers. University of California, San Diego electrical engineers recently developed the first ultra compact, low power pulse compressor on a...

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2010-11-22 09:42:53

The research, modeling an 8.0 quake in Southern California, was selected as a finalist for the Gordon Bell prize for outstanding achievement in high-performance computing applications A multi-disciplinary team of researchers has presented the world's most advanced earthquake shaking simulation at the Supercomputing 2010 (SC10) conference held last week in New Orleans. The research was selected as a finalist for the Gordon Bell prize, awarded at the annual conference for outstanding...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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