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Latest University of California, San Diego Stories

Epigenetics Changes Genes In Rheumatoid Arthritis
2012-07-03 12:19:12

It's not just our DNA that makes us susceptible to disease and influences its impact and outcome. Scientists are beginning to realize more and more that important changes in genes that are unrelated to changes in the DNA sequence itself — a field of study known as epigenetics — are equally influential. A research team at the University of California, San Diego — led by Gary S. Firestein, professor in the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology at UC San Diego...

'Graphene' A Tunable Plasmonic Medium
2012-06-20 13:07:27

With a beam of infrared light, scientists have sent ripples of electrons along the surface of graphene and demonstrated that they can control the length and height of these oscillations, called plasmons, using a simple electrical circuit. This is the first time anyone has observed plasmons on graphene, sheets of carbon just one atom thick with a host of intriguing physical properties, and an important step toward using plasmons to process and transmit information in spaces too tight to use...

Infectious Diseases Determined Current Gene Makeup
2012-06-05 08:08:25

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com The author J.J. Dewey once said, "Consciousness cannot live in the present for the present cannot exist without the future and the past." This idea of the past influencing the present was seen in a recent report published in the online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that proposed that the inactivation of two genes linked to the immune system could have given some ancestors of modern humans greater protection from specific...

2012-05-24 21:01:08

Excitons form Bose-Einstein condensate Physicists have trapped and cooled exotic particles called excitons so effectively that they condensed and cohered to form a giant matter wave. This feat will allow scientists to better study the physical properties of excitons, which exist only fleetingly yet offer promising applications as diverse as efficient harvesting of solar energy and ultrafast computing. "The realization of the exciton condensate in a trap opens the opportunity to study...

2012-05-22 08:58:01

In July 2002 the publication of the first Women's Health Initiative (WHI) report caused a dramatic drop in Menopausal Hormone Therapy (HT) use throughout the world. Now a major reappraisal by international experts, published as a series of articles in the peer-reviewed journal Climacteric (the official journal of the International Menopause Society), shows how the evidence has changed over the last 10 years, and supports a return to a "rational use of HT, initiated near the menopause". The...

Arthritis Drug Powerful Against Human Dysentery
2012-05-22 07:38:01

Connie K. Ho for RedOrbit.com Every year, 50 million people throughout the world contract amebiasis through contaminated food or water. With this shocking statistic, it is considered the third leading cause of illness and the fourth leading cause of death due to protozoan infection on a global basis. A collaborative project by researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), and Wake Forest Medical School recently...

2012-05-18 02:20:26

Imagine reading an entire book, but then realizing that your glasses did not allow you to distinguish "g" from "q." What details did you miss? Geneticists faced a similar problem with the recent discovery of a "sixth nucleotide" in the DNA alphabet. Two modifications of cytosine, one of the four bases that make up DNA, look almost the same but mean different things. But scientists lacked a way of reading DNA, letter by letter, and detecting precisely where these modifications are found in...

2012-05-17 12:17:17

Biologists at the University of California, San Diego have succeeded in engineering algae to produce potential candidates for a vaccine that would prevent transmission of the parasite that causes malaria, an achievement that could pave the way for the development of an inexpensive way to protect billions of people from one of the world's most prevalent and debilitating diseases. Initial proof-of-principle experiments suggest that such a vaccine could prevent malaria transmission. Malaria...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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