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Latest University of California, San Francisco Stories

2013-03-13 18:02:56

UCSF study on T-cell behavior sheds light on how vaccines work The immune system's T cells, while coordinating responses to diseases and vaccines, act like honey bees sharing information about the best honey sources, according to a new study by scientists at UC San Francisco. "In the morning, each bee goes looking individually for a sugar source, then comes back to the hive and does a dance in front of the other bees describing the location of what it's found, which helps the hive...

2013-02-28 13:53:07

UCSF study examines patient bills for top 10 visits to the emergency room It's a basic, reasonable question: How much will this cost me? For patients in the emergency room, the answer all too often is a mystery. Emergency departments play a critical role in health care, yet consumers typically know little about how medical charges are determined and often underestimate their financial responsibility -- then are shocked when the hospital bill arrives. A new study led by UC San...

2013-02-14 13:36:05

Over a span of nearly 20 years, California's tobacco control program cost $2.4 billion and reduced health care costs by $134 billion, according to a new study by UC San Francisco. Additionally, the study -- covering the beginning of the program in 1989 to 2008 -- found that the state program helped lead to some 6.8 billion fewer packs of cigarettes being sold that would have been worth $28.5 billion in sales to cigarette companies. The study was designed to calculate the fiscal impact...

Breast Cancer Mutation Linked To Early Onset Menopause
2013-01-30 09:42:51

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Scientists from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) recently conducted a study that showed a significantly earlier onset of menopause for women who inherited a mutation in one of the breast cancer susceptibility (BRCA) genes. These genes, known as BRCA1 or BRCA2, are tumor suppressor genes, meaning that they prevent uncontrolled cell growth. The study is of particular importance as it points to the possibility...

2013-01-28 15:46:24

The spread of breast cancer to distant organs within the body, an event that often leads to death, appears in many cases to involve the loss of a key protein, according to UC San Francisco researchers, whose new discoveries point to possible targets for therapy. In the January 27, 2013 online edition of Nature Cell Biology, UCSF scientists describe for the first time how the protein, known as GATA3 – which is abnormal or absent in many cases of human breast cancer – normally...

2013-01-23 10:49:40

Commentary sheds light on approval process for implantable body parts Technological advancements in medicine have allowed patients suffering from musculoskeletal conditions such as hip and knee pain to regain mobility and live relatively pain-free. But some "high risk" surgical devices that have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are not required to go through clinical trials, where a product is tested to determine its safety and effectiveness. "This could be...

2013-01-17 10:35:47

New research in Nature concludes the eye — which depends on light to see — also needs light to develop normally during pregnancy. Scientists say the unexpected finding offers a new basic understanding of fetal eye development and ocular diseases caused by vascular disorders — in particular one called retinopathy of prematurity that can blind premature infants. The research, led by scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and the University of...


Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'