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Latest University of Cambridge Stories

2011-02-01 11:00:00

REDMOND, Wash. and WAKEFIELD, Mass., Feb. 1, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The Outercurve Foundation, in collaboration with Microsoft Research and University of Cambridge, today announced that the Chemistry Add-In for Word project has been added to the Foundation's Research Accelerators Gallery, a collection of open source projects that benefit the research and science communities. The Chemistry Add-In for Word (also known as the Chem4Word project) was developed by Microsoft Research and Drs....

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2011-01-27 07:15:00

The mechanism that controls the internal 24-hour clock of all forms of life from human cells to algae has been cracked by researchers. Not only does the finding provide important insight into health-related issues linked to individuals with disrupted internal clocks -- such as pilots and shift workers -- it also indicates that the 24-hour circadian clock found in human cells is the same as that found in algae and dates back to when the earliest life on Earth was formed. New research...

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2011-01-25 06:05:00

Scientists suggest that man flu is not a myth, after finding they suffer more because they invest in their spirit of adventure at the expense of their immune system. Men's ability to turn a sniffle into the flu and a headache into a migraine has long been a source of annoyance to their better halves, reports The Daily Telegraph. But according to the new research, there could be proof that they are not faking it, and that they suffer diseases more seriously and for longer. Scientists...

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2011-01-04 13:10:00

Clues about how the human gut helps regulate our appetite have come from a most unusual source "“ fruit fly feces. Scientists at the University of Cambridge are using the fruit fly to help understand aspects of human metabolism, including why pregnant women suffer from bloating and constipation, and even the link between a low calorie diet and longevity. Although scientists have known for some time that there are as many as 500 million nerve cells in our gut, the sheer complexity that...

2010-12-20 08:26:00

KAIFENG, China, Dec. 20, 2010 /PRNewswire-Asia-FirstCall/ -- China Valves Technology, Inc. (Nasdaq: CVVT) ("China Valves" or the "Company"), a leading metal valve manufacturer with operations in the People's Republic of China (the "PRC"), today announced that the company has signed a strategic partnership agreement with the Centre for Advanced Photonics and Electronics ("CAPE"), University of Cambridge and becomes the sole member of the steering committee of CAPE of Cambridge University in...

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2010-12-16 11:28:52

University of Leicester researcher finds photographs of Amazonians brought to London by Roger Casement A University of Leicester researcher has discovered two photographic images, presumed lost, of native Americans brought to Britain by Roger Casement a century ago. Dr Lesley Wylie, Lecturer in Latin American Studies in the School of Modern Languages, University of Leicester, made the discovery during her research for a book on the Putumayo, a border region in the Amazon. Her book forms part...

2010-11-23 06:30:00

SASA, Israel, November 23, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Plasan, a global leader in survivability and combat-proven armor solutions and Q-Flo, University of Cambridge spin-out company, today announced the formation of TorTech Nano Fibres Ltd, a joint venture between the two companies. TorTech, based in Israel, will produce carbon nanotube fiber for the enhancement of body armor and composite armor systems for vehicles. The new material is stronger than Kevlar and other ballistic fabrics, but...

2010-11-17 17:06:17

Research has important implications for both agriculture and energy Scientists at the University of Cambridge are working on ways to improve the efficiency of the ammonia synthesis process. With between 3-5% of the world's natural gas used to create artificial fertilizers, the new research could have major implications for both the agricultural and energy sectors. Ammonia (NH3) is one of the most important chemicals in the modern world, due mainly to its use in the manufacture of artificial...

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2010-11-16 08:45:22

Findings could one day lead to improved treatment of spinal cord injuries Scientists have discovered the origin of a unique type of cell known for its ability to support regeneration in the central nervous system. Their findings, published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA (PNAS), raise the possibility of obtaining a more reliable source of these cells for use in cell transplantation therapy for spinal cord injuries. Olfactory ensheathing cells...

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2010-11-10 08:50:00

British university scientists have discovered a species of bushcricket that boasts the largest testicles in the animal kingdom, representing 14 percent of their total body weight, according to a new study published Wednesday in the journal Biology Letters. In the study, biologists at the University of Derby and the University of Cambridge noted that the sizable testes of the Tuberous Bushcricket (Platycleis affinis)--the largest in relation to body weight in the world--point towards rampant...


Word of the Day
lunula
  • A small crescent-shaped structure or marking, especially the white area at the base of a fingernail that resembles a half-moon.
This word is a diminutive of the Latin 'luna,' moon.
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