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Latest University of Cambridge Stories

Researchers Develop Cerebral Cortex Cells From Skin
2012-02-13 13:44:33

Researchers at the University of Cambridge report that they created cerebral cortex cells from a small sample of human skin. The new development could pave the way for techniques to explore a wide range of diseases such as autism and Alzheimer's. The findings could also enable scientists to study how the human cerebral cortex develops -- and how it "wires up" and how that can go wrong. "This approach gives us the ability to study human brain development and disease in ways that were...

Researchers Crack The Ponytail Code
2012-02-13 09:11:49

British scientists reported Friday they have cracked the mathematical conundrum behind the shape of hair that has perplexed humanity since Leonardo da Vinci first pondered it some 500 years ago. The “Rapunzel Number,” a mathematical equation devised by scientists from the University of Cambridge and the University of Warwick, has helped quantify the curliness of human hair and can be used to predict the shape of any ponytail. Cambridge Professor Raymond Goldstein and...

2012-02-10 15:09:37

Fool's gold may prove an unlikely alternative to overexploited catalytic materials Catalytic materials, which lower the energy barriers for chemical reactions, are used in everything from the commercial production of chemicals to catalytic converters in car engines. However, with current catalytic materials becoming increasingly expensive, scientists are exploring viable alternatives. Researchers at the University of Cambridge have now discovered that the sulphide material iron pyrite,...

New Solar Cell Grabs More Of The Sun's Energy
2012-02-09 04:24:13

New solar cells could increase the maximum efficiency of solar panels by over 25%, according to scientists from the University of Cambridge. Scientists from the Cavendish Laboratory, the University's Department of Physics, have developed a novel type of solar cell which could harvest energy from the sun much more efficiently than traditional designs. The research, published Feb 8 in the journal Nano Letters, could dramatically improve the amount of useful energy created by solar panels....

Modern Racehorses Got Their 'Speed Gene' From British Mare 300 Years Ago
2012-01-25 05:12:40

'Speed gene' in modern racehorses originated from British mare 300 years ago, scientists say Scientists have traced the origin of the 'speed gene' in Thoroughbred racehorses back to a single British mare that lived in the United Kingdom around 300 years ago, according to findings published in the scientific journal Nature Communications. The origin of the 'speed gene' (C type myostatin gene variant) was revealed by analyzing DNA from hundreds of horses, including DNA extracted from the...

Farthest Galaxy Protocluster Discovered By Hubble
2012-01-10 13:25:20

Thanks to the Hubble Space Telescope, a team of astronomers have located the most distant grouping of still-developing galaxies ever witnessed in the early universe, NASA announced on Tuesday. According to the U.S. space agency, Hubble found a cluster of five tiny galaxies located 13.1 billion light years away during a random sky survey conducted in near-infrared light. The galaxies in the developing cluster, or protocluster, are said to be among the brightest at that epoch and were...

Crows Show Advanced Learning Abilities
2011-12-16 03:49:10

New Caledonian crows have, in the past, distinguished themselves with their advanced tool using abilities. A team of researchers from the University of Auckland and the University of Cambridge have now shown these crows can learn to use new types of tools. When confronted with the Aesop's fable paradigm, which requires stones to be dropped into a water-filled tube to bring floating food within reach, the crows quickly learned to use stones as tools. They then preferred to drop into the...

Botanists Answer Mystery Of Glowing Buttercups
2011-12-15 09:41:34

As a child, did you ever shine a buttercup flower under your chin and witness a yellow glow to test whether you or your friends like butter? Well scientists have taken a closer look to better understand how this works and discovered the distinctive glossiness of the buttercup flower is related to its unique anatomical structure, according to a study published in the Royal Society journal Interface. The bright and glossy appearance of the buttercup petals is the result of the interplay...

2011-12-14 11:43:44

New research sheds light on children´s game and provides insight into pollination Scientists have found that the distinctive glossiness of the buttercup flower (Ranunculus repens), which children like to shine under the chin to test whether their friends like butter, is related to its unique anatomical structure. Their findings were published today, 14 December, in the Royal Society journal Interface. The researchers discovered that the buttercup petal's unique bright and glossy...

2011-11-29 10:59:52

A University of Cambridge study, which set out to investigate DNA methylation in the human heart and the 'missing link' between our lifestyle and our health, has now mapped the link in detail across the entire human genome. The new data collected greatly benefits a field that is still in its scientific infancy and is a significant leap ahead of where the researchers were, even 18 months ago. Researcher Roger Foo explains: "By going wider and scanning the genome in greater detail this...


Word of the Day
lunula
  • A small crescent-shaped structure or marking, especially the white area at the base of a fingernail that resembles a half-moon.
This word is a diminutive of the Latin 'luna,' moon.
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