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Latest University of Cambridge Stories

2011-10-12 23:11:52

New gene therapy methods accurately correct mutation in patient's stem cells, bringing personalized cell therapies one step closer For the first time, scientists have cleanly corrected a human gene mutation in a patient's stem cells. The result, reported in Nature on Wednesday 12 October, brings the possibility of patient-specific therapies closer to becoming a reality. The team, led by researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the University of Cambridge, targeted a gene...

2011-10-05 14:04:17

Research provides new insight into why some of us are better than others at remembering what really happened A structural variation in a part of the brain may explain why some people are better than others at distinguishing real events from those they might have imagined or been told about, researchers have found. The University of Cambridge scientists found that normal variation in a fold at the front of the brain called the paracingulate sulcus (or PCS) might explain why some people...

2011-09-15 12:17:14

Research provides new insight into why some individuals may be more aggressive than others Fluctuations of serotonin levels in the brain, which often occur when someone hasn't eaten or is stressed, affects brain regions that enable people to regulate anger, new research from the University of Cambridge has shown. Although reduced serotonin levels have previously been implicated in aggression, this is the first study which has shown how this chemical helps regulate behavior in the brain...

2011-09-08 20:48:52

Research lays groundwork for the development of new, targeted pain medications A gene responsible for regulating chronic pain, called HCN2, has been identified by scientists at the University of Cambridge. The Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and EU funded research, published today (09 September) in the journal Science, opens up the possibility of targeting drugs to block the protein produced by the gene in order to combat chronic pain. Approximately one...

Scientists Create Mammalian Cells With Single Chromosome Set
2011-09-08 06:14:18

  Researchers have created mammalian cells containing a single set of chromosomes for the first time in research funded by the Wellcome Trust and EMBO. The technique should allow scientists to better establish the relationships between genes and their function. Mammal cells usually contain two sets of chromosomes — one set inherited from the mother, one from the father. The genetic information contained in these chromosome sets helps determine how our bodies develop. Changes...

2011-09-01 17:00:24

Separating land for nature and land for crops may be the best way to meet increased food demand with the least impact on wild species In parts of the world still rich in biodiversity, separating natural habitats from high-yielding farmland could be a more effective way to conserve wild species than trying to grow crops and conserve nature on the same land, according to a new study published today (2 September 2011) in the journal Science. The study, by researchers at the University of...

chocolate
2011-08-29 10:25:14

  There has been a highly-publicized string of studies in recent years showing potential health benefits from eating chocolate, dark chocolate in particular, which contain flavanol compounds believed to be good for the blood system. On Monday, the European Society of Cardiology Congress was informed of research suggesting that chocolate consumption might be associated with a one third reduction in the risk of developing heart disease, but why there should be such a link was...

2011-07-12 12:50:54

Research provides opportunity for identifying genes linked to autism Siblings of people with autism show a similar pattern of brain activity to that seen in people with autism when looking at emotional facial expressions. The University of Cambridge researchers identified the reduced activity in a part of the brain associated with empathy and argue it may be a 'biomarker' for a familial risk of autism. Dr Michael Spencer, who led the study from the University's Autism Research Centre, said:...

2011-07-04 12:45:56

Research reveals vital insight into spintronics Scientists have taken one step closer to the next generation of computers. Research from the Cavendish Laboratory, the University of Cambridge's Department of Physics, provides new insight into spintronics, which has been hailed as the successor to the transistor. Spintronics, which exploits the electron's tiny magnetic moment, or 'spin', could radically change computing due to its potential of high-speed, high-density and low-power consumption....


Word of the Day
lambent
  • Licking.
  • Hence Running along or over a surface, as if in the act of licking; flowing over or along; lapping or bathing; softly bright; gleaming.
This word comes the Latin 'lambere,' to lick.
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