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Latest University of Cambridge Stories

2011-12-14 11:43:44

New research sheds light on children´s game and provides insight into pollination Scientists have found that the distinctive glossiness of the buttercup flower (Ranunculus repens), which children like to shine under the chin to test whether their friends like butter, is related to its unique anatomical structure. Their findings were published today, 14 December, in the Royal Society journal Interface. The researchers discovered that the buttercup petal's unique bright and glossy...

2011-11-29 10:59:52

A University of Cambridge study, which set out to investigate DNA methylation in the human heart and the 'missing link' between our lifestyle and our health, has now mapped the link in detail across the entire human genome. The new data collected greatly benefits a field that is still in its scientific infancy and is a significant leap ahead of where the researchers were, even 18 months ago. Researcher Roger Foo explains: "By going wider and scanning the genome in greater detail this...

2011-11-28 11:34:16

Research demonstrates simple, scaleable method with realistic capability of industrial cross-over Scientists have developed a new method of creating nanoporous materials with potential applications in everything from water purification to chemical sensors. In order to produce a porous material it is necessary to have multiple components. When the minor component is removed, small pores are left in its place. Until now, creating nanoporous materials was limiting as it was believed the...

2011-11-21 17:00:00

The Materials Research Society and Cambridge University Press announce publication of the first issue of MRS Communications, a new journal serving the international materials research community. Cambridge, UK & New York, USA (PRWEB) November 21, 2011 The Materials Research Society and Cambridge University Press announce publication of the first issue of MRS Communications, a new journal serving the international materials research community. Edited by Peter Green and published by the...

2011-10-26 13:14:02

Research provides insight into novel approach which could be used in pharmaceutical drug synthesis New research shows how metal surfaces that lack mirror symmetry could provide a novel approach towards manufacturing pharmaceuticals. These 'intrinsically chiral' metal surfaces offer potential new ways to control chiral chemistry, pointing to the intriguing possibility of using heterogeneous catalysis in drug synthesis. Such surfaces could also become the basis of new biosensor...

2011-10-12 23:11:52

New gene therapy methods accurately correct mutation in patient's stem cells, bringing personalized cell therapies one step closer For the first time, scientists have cleanly corrected a human gene mutation in a patient's stem cells. The result, reported in Nature on Wednesday 12 October, brings the possibility of patient-specific therapies closer to becoming a reality. The team, led by researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the University of Cambridge, targeted a gene...

2011-10-05 14:04:17

Research provides new insight into why some of us are better than others at remembering what really happened A structural variation in a part of the brain may explain why some people are better than others at distinguishing real events from those they might have imagined or been told about, researchers have found. The University of Cambridge scientists found that normal variation in a fold at the front of the brain called the paracingulate sulcus (or PCS) might explain why some people...

2011-09-15 12:17:14

Research provides new insight into why some individuals may be more aggressive than others Fluctuations of serotonin levels in the brain, which often occur when someone hasn't eaten or is stressed, affects brain regions that enable people to regulate anger, new research from the University of Cambridge has shown. Although reduced serotonin levels have previously been implicated in aggression, this is the first study which has shown how this chemical helps regulate behavior in the brain...

2011-09-08 20:48:52

Research lays groundwork for the development of new, targeted pain medications A gene responsible for regulating chronic pain, called HCN2, has been identified by scientists at the University of Cambridge. The Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and EU funded research, published today (09 September) in the journal Science, opens up the possibility of targeting drugs to block the protein produced by the gene in order to combat chronic pain. Approximately one...


Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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