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chocolate
2011-08-29 10:25:14

  There has been a highly-publicized string of studies in recent years showing potential health benefits from eating chocolate, dark chocolate in particular, which contain flavanol compounds believed to be good for the blood system. On Monday, the European Society of Cardiology Congress was informed of research suggesting that chocolate consumption might be associated with a one third reduction in the risk of developing heart disease, but why there should be such a link was...

2011-07-12 12:50:54

Research provides opportunity for identifying genes linked to autism Siblings of people with autism show a similar pattern of brain activity to that seen in people with autism when looking at emotional facial expressions. The University of Cambridge researchers identified the reduced activity in a part of the brain associated with empathy and argue it may be a 'biomarker' for a familial risk of autism. Dr Michael Spencer, who led the study from the University's Autism Research Centre, said:...

2011-07-04 12:45:56

Research reveals vital insight into spintronics Scientists have taken one step closer to the next generation of computers. Research from the Cavendish Laboratory, the University of Cambridge's Department of Physics, provides new insight into spintronics, which has been hailed as the successor to the transistor. Spintronics, which exploits the electron's tiny magnetic moment, or 'spin', could radically change computing due to its potential of high-speed, high-density and low-power consumption....

2011-06-29 18:02:19

Research finds connection between impulsivity and superstitions in pathological gamblers Research led by the University of Cambridge has found a link between impulsivity and flawed reasoning (such as believing in superstitious rituals and luck) in problem gamblers. Studying compulsive gamblers who were seeking treatment at the National Problem Gambling Clinic, the researchers found that those gamblers with higher levels of impulsivity were much more susceptible to errors in reasoning...

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2011-06-24 07:37:59

The brilliant colors of birds have inspired poets and nature lovers, but researchers at Yale University and the University of Cambridge say these existing hues represent only a fraction of what birds are capable of seeing. The findings based on study of the avian visual system, reported in the June 23 issue of the journal Behavioral Ecology, show that over millions of years of evolution plumage colors went from dull to bright as birds gradually acquired the ability to create newer pigments...

2011-06-23 15:24:24

Research reveals plumages exhibit less than a third of possible colors birds can see Contrary to our human perception of bird coloration as extraordinarily diverse, a new study reports that bird plumages exhibit only a small fraction (less than a third) of the possible colors birds can observe. Early lineages of living birds probably produced an even smaller range of colors, but the evolution of innovative pigments and structural (or optical) colors has allowed many birds to create more...

2011-06-21 12:09:25

Research gives insight into why some people develop addiction Researchers at the University of Cambridge have identified abnormal brain structures in the frontal lobe of cocaine users' brains which are linked to their compulsive cocaine-using behavior. Their findings were published today, 21 June, in the journal Brain. Led by Dr Karen Ersche, the Cambridge researchers scanned the brains of 120 people, half of whom had a dependence on cocaine. They found that the cocaine users had widespread...

2011-06-15 10:07:00

WASHINGTON, June 15, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Carnegie Mellon University's Pradeep K. Khosla will participate in a panel, titled "Cybersecurity, Freedom and Policy," at the 21st Annual Conference on Computers, Freedom & Privacy: "The Future Is Now." The panel will explore the roles governments, companies, users and advocates can and should play in attempting to create a free and safe Internet. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20020422/CMULOGO ) Khosla, a University Professor --...

2011-05-23 14:53:35

Study shows that compulsions lead to obsessions, and not the other way around New scientific evidence challenges a popular conception that behaviours such as repetitive hand-washing, characteristic of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), are carried out in response to disturbing obsessive fears. The study, conducted at the University of Cambridge in collaboration with the University of Amsterdam, found that in the case of OCD the behaviours themselves (the compulsions) might be the precursors...

2011-05-18 07:00:00

AUSTIN, Texas, May 18, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- GYLO (GetYa Learn On, LLC) and Cambridge University Press today announced a partnership to produce multiple medical books as interactive apps for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch devices. Initially, three of Cambridge's key texts for medical trainees and practitioners will be converted to iOS apps, which cover Radiology, Neuropharmacology and Anaesthesia. Released in the iTunes Store in June 2011, the first app will be a portable version of the...


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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