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Latest University of Cambridge Stories

2011-09-15 12:17:14

Research provides new insight into why some individuals may be more aggressive than others Fluctuations of serotonin levels in the brain, which often occur when someone hasn't eaten or is stressed, affects brain regions that enable people to regulate anger, new research from the University of Cambridge has shown. Although reduced serotonin levels have previously been implicated in aggression, this is the first study which has shown how this chemical helps regulate behavior in the brain...

2011-09-08 20:48:52

Research lays groundwork for the development of new, targeted pain medications A gene responsible for regulating chronic pain, called HCN2, has been identified by scientists at the University of Cambridge. The Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and EU funded research, published today (09 September) in the journal Science, opens up the possibility of targeting drugs to block the protein produced by the gene in order to combat chronic pain. Approximately one...

Scientists Create Mammalian Cells With Single Chromosome Set
2011-09-08 06:14:18

  Researchers have created mammalian cells containing a single set of chromosomes for the first time in research funded by the Wellcome Trust and EMBO. The technique should allow scientists to better establish the relationships between genes and their function. Mammal cells usually contain two sets of chromosomes — one set inherited from the mother, one from the father. The genetic information contained in these chromosome sets helps determine how our bodies develop. Changes...

2011-09-01 17:00:24

Separating land for nature and land for crops may be the best way to meet increased food demand with the least impact on wild species In parts of the world still rich in biodiversity, separating natural habitats from high-yielding farmland could be a more effective way to conserve wild species than trying to grow crops and conserve nature on the same land, according to a new study published today (2 September 2011) in the journal Science. The study, by researchers at the University of...

chocolate
2011-08-29 10:25:14

  There has been a highly-publicized string of studies in recent years showing potential health benefits from eating chocolate, dark chocolate in particular, which contain flavanol compounds believed to be good for the blood system. On Monday, the European Society of Cardiology Congress was informed of research suggesting that chocolate consumption might be associated with a one third reduction in the risk of developing heart disease, but why there should be such a link was...

2011-07-12 12:50:54

Research provides opportunity for identifying genes linked to autism Siblings of people with autism show a similar pattern of brain activity to that seen in people with autism when looking at emotional facial expressions. The University of Cambridge researchers identified the reduced activity in a part of the brain associated with empathy and argue it may be a 'biomarker' for a familial risk of autism. Dr Michael Spencer, who led the study from the University's Autism Research Centre, said:...

2011-07-04 12:45:56

Research reveals vital insight into spintronics Scientists have taken one step closer to the next generation of computers. Research from the Cavendish Laboratory, the University of Cambridge's Department of Physics, provides new insight into spintronics, which has been hailed as the successor to the transistor. Spintronics, which exploits the electron's tiny magnetic moment, or 'spin', could radically change computing due to its potential of high-speed, high-density and low-power consumption....

2011-06-29 18:02:19

Research finds connection between impulsivity and superstitions in pathological gamblers Research led by the University of Cambridge has found a link between impulsivity and flawed reasoning (such as believing in superstitious rituals and luck) in problem gamblers. Studying compulsive gamblers who were seeking treatment at the National Problem Gambling Clinic, the researchers found that those gamblers with higher levels of impulsivity were much more susceptible to errors in reasoning...

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2011-06-24 07:37:59

The brilliant colors of birds have inspired poets and nature lovers, but researchers at Yale University and the University of Cambridge say these existing hues represent only a fraction of what birds are capable of seeing. The findings based on study of the avian visual system, reported in the June 23 issue of the journal Behavioral Ecology, show that over millions of years of evolution plumage colors went from dull to bright as birds gradually acquired the ability to create newer pigments...


Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.