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Latest University of Copenhagen Stories

Bronze Age Trade Connections Revealed By Ancient Stinging Nettles
2012-09-28 14:22:15

A piece of nettle cloth retrieved from Denmark's richest known Bronze Age burial mound Lusehøj may actually derive from Austria, new findings suggest. The cloth thus tells a surprising story about long-distance Bronze Age trade connections around 800 BC. The findings have just been published in Nature's online journal Scientific Reports. 2,800 years ago, one of Denmark's richest and most powerful men died. His body was burned. And the bereaved wrapped his bones in a cloth...

Gut Bacteria Prevalent In Type 2 Diabetes
2012-09-27 08:58:52

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Bacteria are everywhere. They not only reside in the outside world, but they also live inside the human body. A recent study by scientists found that there are 1.5 kilograms of bacteria in the intestine, affecting individuals´ heath and wellbeing. The team recently revealed that they had made progress in a metagenomic study targeting the human gut microbiota; they believe that the results could determine whether an individual...

Heart Attack Risk Linked To Low Vitamin D Levels
2012-09-25 09:13:44

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 17 million people die from heart disease every year. With this staggering statistic, it is no wonder that heart disease is one of the leading causes of death for adults around the globe. In order to better understand heart disease, researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Copenhagen University Hospital went about studying vitamin D. The group of investigators recently...

2012-09-20 16:54:17

Scientists have been trying to explain the causes of diabetes for many years. Researchers at the University of Copenhagen and Novo Nordisk A/S have now shown that the increased activity of one particular iron-transport protein destroys insulin-producing beta cells. In addition, the new research shows that mice without this iron transporter are protected against developing diabetes. These results have just been published in the prestigious journal Cell Metabolism. Almost 300,000 Danes have...

2012-09-19 16:01:34

A new Cochrane Review concludes that all countries should consider establishing proper home birth services. They should also provide low-risk pregnant women with information enabling them to make an informed choice. The review has been prepared by senior researcher, statistician Ole Olsen, the Research Unit for General Practice, University of Copenhagen, and midwifery lecturer PhD Jette Aaroe Clausen. In many countries it is believed that the safest option for all women is to give birth in...

New Fungal Species Discovered In Denmark
2012-09-04 15:28:55

A new fungal species, called Hebelomagriseopruinatum, has now officially been included in the list of species. The fungus, whose name can be translated into ℠the grey-dewy tear leaf´, was discovered on Zealand in Denmark during a mushroom-hunting tour headed by postdoc Jacob Heilman-Clausen from the University of Copenhagen. During a mushroom-hunting excursion to Eskebjerg Vesterlyng in 2009, postdoc Jacob Heilman-Clausen from the Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate...

2012-08-23 23:50:10

Enzymes involved in breaking down fat can now be manipulated to work three times harder by turning on a molecular switch recently observed by chemists at the University of Copenhagen. Being able to control this chemical on/off button could have massive implications for curing diseases related to obesity including diabetes, cardio vascular disease, stroke and even skin problems like acne. But the implications may be wider. Possibly the most important discovery in enzymology The results...

2012-08-13 21:54:44

About 25,000 Danes currently live with congenital heart defects. Both heredity and environment play a role for these malformations, but exactly how various risk factors influence the development of the heart during pregnancy has been a mystery until now. With the aid of a supercomputer, an international, interdisciplinary research team has analyzed millions of data points. This has allowed the scientists to show that a huge number of different risk factors — for example in the form...

2012-08-06 11:23:56

Plants produce toxins to defend themselves against potential enemies, from herbivorous pests to diseases. Oilseed rape plants produce glucosinolates to serve this purpose. However, due to the content of glucosinolates, farmers can only use limited quantities of the protein-rich rapeseed for pig and chicken feed. Now, a team of researchers from the University of Copenhagen has developed a method to hinder unwanted toxins from entering the edible parts of the plant. The breakthrough was...

Greedy Pest Insects Deceived With Help From Gene Technology
2012-08-01 08:10:22

Worldwide cabbage farmers have vast problems with the diamond-back moth. It lays its eggs on the cabbage plants and the voracious appetite of the larvae ruins the yield. However, Morten Emil Møldrup from the University of Copenhagen has developed a method to deceive the greedy insects. Møldrup presents his spectacular research results at a public PhD defense on Friday 3 August. "We have discovered a way to cheat the diamond-back moths to lay their eggs on...