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Latest University of Copenhagen Stories

2012-05-09 14:34:48

Danish teenagers are not looking for answers to life's big questions in established religious institutions. Instead, they engage in intense idolization of American films and TV shows about vampires, angels and other supernatural beings. A new PhD thesis from the University of Copenhagen shows that a series like Twilight for some young Danes replace traditional religion and enhance their interest in spiritual and religious issues. Many Danish teenagers reject old-fashioned established...

2012-05-02 11:38:24

A true obesity epidemic is gradually advancing throughout the developed world. A large new Danish-British study from the University of Copenhagen and University of Bristol documents for the first time a definite correlation between a high BMI and the risk of developing life-threatening cardiac disease. Heart attack, atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries and angina — also called ischemic heart disease — are the most common causes of death in adults worldwide. In the US alone,...

2012-04-30 14:57:53

India's image has changed dramatically in the last decade from an aid recipient nation to a global power. The shift in this image is not merely a result of economic growth figures alone — it has resulted from a carefully managed "image campaign" that the Indian government has invested in. New research by Ravinder Kaur from the University of Copenhagen shows the processes through which a brand new identity for the Indian nation is manufactured. On 2 May, a large international conference...

2012-04-26 12:07:31

Scientists from The Danish Stem Cell Center (DanStem) at the University of Copenhagen and Hagedorn Research Institute have gained new insight into the signaling paths that control the body´s insulin production. This is important knowledge with respect to their final goal: the conversion of stem cells into insulin-producing beta cells that can be implanted into patients who need them. The research results have just been published in the well-respected journal PNAS. Insulin is a hormone...

2012-04-24 23:19:51

Together with child and adolescent psychiatrists, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have just completed an extensive report which reviews the studies which have been done so far on the significance of diet for children and young people with ADHD. The report shows that there are potential benefits in changing the diets of children with ADHD, but that key knowledge in the area is still lacking. The comprehensive report covers the scientific literature on the significance of diet...

Leeches To Track Mammal DNA In Jungles
2012-04-24 06:10:55

Connie K. Ho for RedOrbit.com Researchers from Copenhagen Zoo and the University of Copenhagen have discovered a way to track mammals in the jungles of Southeast Asia. Scientists collected leeches from the jungles to analyze the blood and DNA of animals taken by the parasites. With this new method, researchers will be able to study the biodiversity of the mammals without having to track each one down. The findings, to be published in science journal Current Biology, allow scientists to...

2012-04-04 20:26:42

Researchers, including plant researchers from the University of Copenhagen, have developed a new type of the corn-like crop sorghum, which may become very significant for food supplies in drought-prone areas. Unlike the conventional drought-resistant sorghum plant, which is an important crop in e.g. Africa, China and the USA, this new type does not form toxic cyanide when exposed to long-term drought. Consequently, farmers in drought areas will no longer need to discard their sorghum crops in...

2012-03-15 23:38:34

Using state-of-the-art technology, scientists at the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research at the University of Copenhagen and their international collaborators have successfully obtained "molecular snapshots" of tens of thousands processes involved in DNA damage repair. On a daily basis this restoration keeps cells healthy and prevents the development of cancer. The results of this study will help unravel exactly how cells repair their broken DNA, how chemotherapy affects...

2012-03-12 11:33:30

Within all our cells lies two meters of DNA, highly ordered in a structure of less than 10 micro meters in diameter. Special proteins called histones act as small building bricks, organising our DNA in this structure. Preservation of the structure is necessary to maintain correct function of our genes, making histones detrimental for maintaining a healthy and functional body. The research group of Associate Professor Anja Groth from BRIC, University of Copenhagen, has just elucidated a...

2012-03-08 14:50:09

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have documented a previously unknown biological mechanism in the brain's most important line of defense: the blood-brain barrier. Scientists now know that the barrier helps maintain a delicate balance of glutamate, a vital signal compound in the brain. The research results have just been published in the scientific journal GLIA. Glutamate is the most important activating transmitter substance in the brain. Vital in small amounts, it is toxic for...


Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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