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Latest University of Edinburgh Stories

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria
2014-08-07 02:00:05

The University of Edinburgh Findings about how bacteria cooperate to cause infection may help spot diseases that might jump from animals to people. Bugs that can cooperate best with each other are most likely to be able to jump to new species, including humans, a new study shows. Bacteria interact by releasing molecules to help them adapt to their environment - for example, when killing competing infections in their victim. They coordinate these actions by releasing tiny amounts...

Study Shows Meerkats' Darker Side Is Secret To Their Success
2014-07-24 03:48:59

University of Edinburgh The darker side of meerkats – which sees them prevent their daughters from breeding, and kill their grandchildren – is explained in a new study. Research into the desert creatures – which live in groups with a dominant breeding pair and many adult helpers – shows that the alpha female can flourish when it maintains the sole right to breed. The study shows how this way of life, also found in many animals such as ants and bees, can prove effective...

Warming Climates Intensify Carbon Dioxide Given Out By Oceans
2014-06-09 03:23:28

University of Edinburgh Rising global temperatures could increase the amount of carbon dioxide naturally released by the world's oceans, fueling further climate change, a study suggests. Fresh insight into how the oceans can affect CO2 levels in the atmosphere shows that rising temperatures can indirectly increase the amount of the greenhouse gas emitted by the oceans. Scientists studied a 26,000-year-old sediment core taken from the Gulf of California to find out how the ocean's...

Preschoolers Can Be Smarter Than College Students At Figuring Out Gizmos
2014-03-07 13:24:30

[ Watch The Video: Kids Outsmart Grown-Ups: Berkeley Research ] Yasmin Anwar, University of California, Berkeley Preschoolers can be smarter than college students at figuring out how unusual toys and gadgets work because they’re more flexible and less biased than adults in their ideas about cause and effect, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Edinburgh. The findings suggest that technology and innovation can benefit from...

Farmers Breed Better Fish Using Genetic Chip
2014-02-14 13:07:00

University of Edinburgh Atlantic salmon production could be boosted by a new technology that will help select the best fish for breeding. The development will enable salmon breeders to improve the quality of their stock and its resistance to disease. A chip loaded with hundreds of thousands of pieces of DNA – each holding a fragment of the salmon's genetic code – will allow breeders to detect fish with the best genes. It does so by detecting variations in the genetic code of...

2014-02-04 11:35:43

New insights into how the cells in our bodies divide could improve our knowledge of a condition linked to cancer, a study suggests. Errors in the cell division process – which allows us to grow and stay healthy – can lead to a genetic disorder called aneuploidy, which is also associated with birth defects and infertility. Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have pinpointed the key role played by a protein in ensuring that cells separate correctly. During cell division,...

Hardworking Sisters Allow Insect Colonies To Thrive
2013-11-21 14:09:25

University of Edinburgh They are among the animal kingdom's most industrious workers … now a study reveals why colonies of ants and bees depend on females for their success. Altruistic workers in social insect colonies – such as ants, bees and wasps – are more likely to be female, because their maternal instincts make them better at caring for the queen's offspring. The findings come from a study of who does what in these highly organized insect societies. In these species, it...

Holograms Offer Hope In Fight Against Malaria
2013-11-06 08:56:44

University of Edinburgh Scientists have developed a 3D filming technique that could help inform research to stem the spread of malaria. Creating moving digital holograms of malaria sperm has given researchers fresh insights into the behavior of these tiny life forms. Understanding how malaria parasites mate could pave the way for improved prevention and control of this deadly disease, which poses a threat to half of the world's population. Malaria parasites mate in the gut of...

2013-07-22 11:18:57

Deforestation in parts of Africa could be reversed with changes to land use, a study suggests. A more strategic approach to managing trees across the continent could have a positive impact on the changing climate, researchers say. A pioneering study of African savannas by the University of Edinburgh has revealed deforestation in south-central Africa, driven by rising populations in the aftermath of war, and increasing demand for trees for agriculture and fuel. This loss of forests...

Sunlight Lowers Blood Pressure
2013-05-08 10:29:13

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Now that the days are getting longer and longer across North America, there´s no excuse for not going outside and getting a little sun. According to a new study by researchers from the University of Edinburgh, exposing the skin to sunlight can lower blood pressure, effectively reducing the risk of stroke, heart attack and cardiovascular disease. The researchers said the blood pressure benefits of getting moderate sunlight most...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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