Quantcast

Latest University of Exeter Stories

Bumblebees Able To Spot Which Flowers Offer Best Rewards
2014-08-01 03:55:22

University of Exeter Bumblebees are able to connect differences in pollen quality with floral features, like petal color, and so land only on the flowers that offer the best rewards, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Exeter. Unlike nectar, bees do not ingest pollen whilst foraging on flowers, and so until now it has been unclear whether they are able to form associative relationships between what a flower looks like and the quality of its pollen. The study...

green turtle
2014-07-31 04:00:00

University of Exeter Sea turtles are not a species one would normally associate with the United Kingdom. But on the remote UK overseas territory of Ascension Island, one of the world’s largest green turtle populations is undergoing something of a renaissance. Writing in the journal Biodiversity and Conservation, scientists from the University of Exeter and Ascension Island Government Conservation Department report that the number of green turtles nesting at the remote South Atlantic...

Stress Can Cause Mongooses Not To Help Out In The Future
2014-07-25 03:38:38

University of Exeter Researchers studying banded mongooses in Uganda have discovered that those who work hard to care for pups may be less likely to invest in future offspring in the same way due to elevated stress hormones. Dr Jennifer Sanderson, from the University of Exeter, has been observing wild banded mongooses to understand why working hard makes them less likely to work hard in the future. She discovered that when a banded mongoose invests heavily to care for mongoose pups,...

Microplastics Worse For Crabs And Other Marine Life Than Previously Thought
2014-07-22 03:43:32

University of Exeter The tiny plastic particles polluting our seas are not only orally ingested by marine creatures, but also enter their systems through their gills, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter. Scientists also discovered that when microplastics are drawn in through this method they take over six times longer to leave the body compared with standard digestion. Lead author Dr Andrew Watts of the University of Exeter said: "Many studies on microplastics...

Monkeys Have Undergone Evolution In Facial Appearance To Avoid Interbreeding
2014-06-27 03:34:36

New York University Old World monkeys have undergone a remarkable evolution in facial appearance as a way of avoiding interbreeding with closely related and geographically proximate species, researchers from New York University and the University of Exeter have found. Their research provides the best evidence to date for the role of visual cues as a barrier to breeding across species. "Evolution produces adaptations that help animals thrive in a particular environment, and over time...

2014-06-23 13:20:37

University of Exeter New study shows drought, heat waves and cold spells linked to air flow changes Variations in high-altitude wind patterns expose particular parts of Europe, Asia and the US to different extreme weather conditions, a new study has shown. Changes to air flow patterns around the Northern Hemisphere are a major influence on prolonged bouts of unseasonal weather – whether it be hot, cold, wet or dry. The high altitude winds normally blow from west to east around...

Scientists Use GPS To Study The Impact Fishing Vessels Have On Seabirds
2014-06-03 03:32:03

University of Exeter Fishing vessels have a far bigger ecological footprint than previously thought, according to research which tracked the movement and behavior of seabirds using GPS devices. A team of scientists led by the University of Exeter discovered that northern gannets change their behavior in response to the presence of large vessels such as trawlers, suggesting each boat can significantly influence the distribution and foraging patterns of these and other marine predators....

Bigger Not Always Better Says New Research On Beetles
2014-04-30 13:34:02

University of Exeter Researchers at the University of Exeter have found that the probability of a burying beetle winning fights, for the small animal carcasses it needs, depends on a combination of early life experiences and the competition it faces as an adult. These beetles use small dead animals, such as mice and songbirds, to provide food for their young and competition for a carcass can be fierce. Previous work has found that success in such contests depends on how good your...

2014-04-30 11:57:57

It's official (in the horned beetle world at least), females prefer courtship over competitiveness – and it doesn't matter about the size of your mandibles either. An international study by scientists at the University of Exeter and the Universities of Okayama and Tsukuba in Japan investigated the complicated sexual conflict over mating in Gnatocerus cornutus, the horned flour-beetle. Female mate choice and male-male competition are the typical mechanisms of sexual selection. However,...

Sexual Conflict Affects Females More Than Males, At Least For Beetles
2014-04-29 17:03:55

University of Exeter Researchers at the University of Exeter have found that sexual conflict over mating impacts the parental care behavior and reproductive productivity of burying beetles. These beetles have surprisingly complex parental care, similar in form to that provided by birds such as robins or blackbirds, with offspring begging to be fed by touching parents, who respond by regurgitating partially digested food. Both males and females provide parental care, but females are...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.