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Latest University of Exeter Stories

Legally Caught Marine Turtles Tops 42,000 Each Year
2014-02-21 08:12:57

University of Exeter A new study has found that 42 countries or territories around the world permit the harvest of marine turtles – and estimates that more than 42,000 turtles are caught each year by these fisheries. The research, carried out by Blue Ventures Conservation and staff at the University of Exeter's Centre for Ecology and Conservation, is the first to comprehensively review the number of turtles currently taken within the law and assess how this compares to other global...

Hidden Crop Pest Threatens Poorer Nations
2014-02-11 15:34:01

University of Exeter The abundance of crop pests in developing countries may be greatly underestimated, posing a significant threat to some of the world's most important food producing nations, according to research led by the University of Exeter. Data on the known distributions of almost 2,000 crop-destroying organisms in 195 countries were analyzed in the first global assessment of the factors determining the distribution of crop pests. Dr Dan Bebber and Professor Sarah Gurr, of...

2014-01-27 10:29:16

The tropical carbon cycle has become twice as sensitive to temperature variations over the past 50 years, new research has revealed. The research shows that a one degree rise in tropical temperature leads to around two billion extra tonnes of carbon being released per year into the atmosphere from tropical ecosystems, compared with the same tropical warming in the 1960s and 1970s. Professor Pierre Friedlingstein and Professor Peter Cox, from the University of Exeter, collaborated with...

2014-01-02 10:18:09

New research by scientists at the University of Exeter has shown that cells demonstrate remarkable flexibility and versatility when it comes to how they divide - a finding with potential links to the underlying causes of many cancers. The study, published today in Developmental Cell, describes a number of routes to the formation of a microtubule spindle – the tracks along which DNA moves when a cell divides in order to make two genetically identical cells. In order to understand the...

Mongooses Synchronize Births To Escape Infanticide
2013-12-24 07:28:41

University of Exeter Some mammals may have evolved to synchronize births as a way of evading the threat of infanticide, according to a study led by the University of Exeter. To ensure groups remain productive, some social animals 'police' selfish reproduction by subordinate animals by killing any offspring they produce. For example, in honeybees and other social insects some workers lay their own eggs, but these are identified and killed by the rest of the workforce. The new study...

2013-11-12 10:42:48

High levels of tungsten in the body could double the risk of suffering a stroke, a new study published in the open access journal PLOS ONE has found. Using data from a large US health survey, the study has shown that high concentrations of tungsten – as measured in urine samples – is strongly linked with an increase in the occurrence of stroke, roughly equal to a doubling of the odds of experiencing the condition. Conducted by a team from the University of Exeter, the study...

Channels In Antarctic Ice Shelf Will Help Predict Future Of Antarctic Ice
2013-10-07 04:31:47

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The discovery of hundreds of kilometers worth of channels beneath a floating ice shelf in Antarctica could help experts understand how the ice will respond to changes in environmental conditions, according to a study published Sunday in the journal Nature Geoscience. Researchers from the University of Exeter, Newcastle University, the University of Bristol, the University of Edinburgh, the British Antarctic Survey and the...

New Island Formation In The Maldives Should Not Be Restricted By Future Sea Level Rise
2013-09-26 12:23:48

University of Exeter The continued accumulation of sand within the iconic ring-shaped reefs inside Maldivian atolls could provide a foundation for future island development new research suggests. Islands like the Maldives are considered likely to be the first to feel the effects of climate change induced sea level rise, with future island growth essential to counter the threat of rising sea levels. The study published in the journal Geology, and carried out by researchers from the...

Cheats Of The Bird World
2013-09-25 08:49:56

University of Exeter Cuckoo finches that lay more than one egg in their victims' nests have a better chance of bamboozling host parents into fostering their parasitic young, a study has found. Dr Martin Stevens from the University of Exeter and Dr Claire Spottiswoode from the University of Cambridge, with Dr Jolyon Troscianko at the University of Exeter, demonstrated that when African cuckoo finch females lay more than one egg in the same nest of their African tawny-flanked prinia...

Wings Of The Morpho Butterfly Inspire New Wave Of Technologies
2013-09-10 06:40:03

[ Watch the Video: Butterfly Wings Inspire New Technologies ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The stunning iridescent wings of the tropical blue Morpho butterfly might expand the range of innovative technologies, according to a new study from an international research team. Findings based on studies of these butterflies have already inspired designs of new displays, fabrics and cosmetics. A research team comprised of scientists from the University of Exeter,...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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