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Latest University of Exeter Stories

2013-07-25 09:52:51

New research from the University of Exeter and King's College London has shown how a population of brown trout can survive in the contaminated waters of the River Hayle in Cornwall where metal concentrations are so high they would be lethal to fish from unpolluted sites. The team believe this is due to changes in the expression of their genes. The research was funded by NERC and the Salmon and Trout Association. The researchers compared the trout living in the River Hayle with a population...

Noise Of Passing Ships Disrupts Feeding For The Common Shore Crab
2013-07-11 12:23:52

University of Exeter A study published in the journal Animal Behaviour found that the noise of passing ships disrupts feeding for the common shore crab. Perhaps worse, the team from the Universities of Exeter and Bristol also found that when threatened, crabs took longer to retreat to shelter and lost their natural 'play dead' behavior. In coastal seas around the world noise caused by humans is a dominant feature, with construction and transportation fundamentally modifying ocean...

Feeding Winter Birds Not Helpful
2013-06-24 14:36:31

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Freezing temperatures and a layer of snow may make us feel sorry for any birds that remain up north during the winter months, but a new study in the journal Scientific Reports has found feeding these birds may not convey any benefits with respect to breeding. A three-year study that was conducted across nine woodland sites in the United Kingdom by researchers at the University of Exeter and the British Trust for Ornithology found...

Rice Blast Research A Step Closer To Controlling Devastating Crop Diseases
2013-06-18 11:57:00

University of Exeter Like a stealthy enemy, blast disease invades rice crops around the world, killing plants and cutting production of one of the most important global food sources. Now a study by an international team of researchers has shed light on how the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, invades plant tissue. The finding is a step towards learning how to control the disease, which by some estimates destroys enough rice to feed 60 million people annually. The team, from the...

British Butterfly Needs Warm Weather This Summer For Survival
2013-06-10 11:38:26

University of Exeter Butterflies are extremely sensitive to changes in temperature and new research has revealed that when summer weather turns bad the silver-spotted skipper battles for survival. The butterfly, which previously faced extinction from habitat loss, is recovering following conservation efforts but the recent cool wet summers in England have almost stalled its progress. A 27 year study by researchers at the University of Exeter in collaboration with the University of York,...

2013-05-29 09:36:55

Recent reduction in the use of antibiotic growth promoters in animal feeds has resulted in a dramatic increase in the severe poultry disease - necrotic enteritis. New research suggests that the disease, which is costing the worldwide poultry industry an estimated £600 million a year, could be prevented by immunization with a vaccine that is being developed at the University of Exeter. Professor Richard Titball of the University of Exeter said: "Necrotic enteritis is a major concern...

New Research On Fish Suggests The Big Guy Doesn't Always Win A Fight
2013-04-26 11:44:09

University of Exeter Scientists at the University of Exeter and Texas A&M University found that when fish fight over food, it is personality, rather than size, that determines whether they will be victorious. The findings suggest that when resources are in short supply personality traits such as aggression could be more important than strength when it comes to survival. The study, published in the journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, found that small fish were able to do...

2013-04-24 12:40:05

Bacteria evolve resistance more quickly when stronger antibiotics are used New scientific research published today in the journal PLoS Biology shows that bacteria can evolve resistance more quickly when stronger antibiotics are used. Researchers from the University of Exeter and Kiel University in Germany treated E. coli with different combinations of antibiotics in laboratory experiments. Unexpectedly they found that the rate of evolution of antibiotic resistance speeds up when...

Diesel Produced By Bacteria On Demand
2013-04-23 10:01:06

University of Exeter It sounds like science fiction but a team from the University of Exeter, with support from Shell, has developed a method to make bacteria produce diesel on demand. While the technology still faces many significant commercialization challenges, the diesel, produced by special strains of E. coli bacteria, is almost identical to conventional diesel fuel and so does not need to be blended with petroleum products as is often required by biodiesels derived from plant oils....


Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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