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Latest University of Exeter Stories

2011-11-18 07:06:36

The study suggests an innovative psychological treatment called 'concreteness training' can reduce depression in just two months and could work as a self-help therapy for depression in primary care. Led by the University of Exeter and funded by the Medical Research Council, the research shows how this new treatment could help some of the 3.5 million people in the UK living with depression. People suffering from depression have a tendency towards unhelpful abstract thinking and over-general...

Among Insects, Chivalry Is Not Dead
2011-10-06 14:17:05

[ Watch the Video ] The long-standing consensus of why insects stick together after mating has been turned on its head by scientists from the University of Exeter. Published today (6 October) in Current Biology, their study shows that, contrary to previous thinking, females benefit from this arrangement just as much as males. Instead of dominating their female partners through bullying and aggressive behavior, males were revealed to be protective, even laying their lives on the line...

Turtles Adapt Eggs For Hotter Beaches
2011-09-26 10:52:53

  'Heat-proof' eggs help turtles cope with hot beaches [ Watch the Video ] Sea turtles face an uncertain future as a warming climate threatens to reduce their reproductive viability. However, new research led by the University of Exeter and published this week in Proceedings of the Royal Society B shows that some turtles are naturally heat-tolerant. The study focused on green turtles nesting on Ascension Island, a UK overseas territory in the South Atlantic Ocean. Scientists...

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2011-08-15 07:09:20

The mystery of how a butterfly has changed its wing patterns to mimic neighboring species and avoid being eaten by birds has been solved by a team of European scientists. The study was published August 14, 2011 in the journal Nature. The greatest evolutionary thinkers, including Wallace, Bates and Darwin, have all wondered how butterflies that taste bad to birds have evolved the same patterns of warning coloration. Now for the first time, researchers led by the CNRS (Mus©um National...

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2011-07-19 09:55:00

Small-scale fisheries could pose a more serious threat to marine life than previously thought. Research led by the University of Exeter, published today (19 July) in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied Ecology, shows that tens of thousands of turtles from across the Pacific are being captured through the activities of small-scale fisheries. Focusing on fisheries in Peru, the study suggests that thousands of sea turtles originating from nesting beaches as far away as Australia,...

2011-07-01 13:28:05

Winning margins in the Tour de France can be tight "“ last year just 39 seconds separated the top two riders after more than 90 hours in the saddle. When every second counts, riders do everything possible to gain a competitive advantage "“ from using aerodynamic carbon fibre bikes to the very latest in sports nutrition. Now there could be a new, completely legal and rather surprising weapon in the armoury for riders aiming to shave vital seconds off their time "“ beetroot...

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2011-06-24 10:48:41

A University of Exeter team has monitored the movements of an entire sub-population of marine turtle for the first time. The study confirms that through satellite tracking we can closely observe the day-to-day lives of marine turtles, accurately predicting their migrations and helping direct conservation efforts. Writing in the journal Diversity and Distributions, lead author and University of Exeter PhD student Dr Lucy Hawkes (now at Bangor University) describes the migrations of a...

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2011-06-20 08:33:40

A University of Exeter biologist has discovered a 'lost' species of bat breeding on the Isles of Scilly (UK). A pregnant female brown long-eared bat is the first of its species to be found on the islands for at least 40 years. It was discovered by Dr Fiona Mathews, Senior Lecturer at the University of Exeter, a postgraduate student and a team from the Wiltshire Bat Group. The Scilly Isles Bat Group called in Dr Mathews and her team to help them find out more about bats on the islands. The...

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2011-05-30 10:40:00

Acupuncture can significantly improve overall well-being and can have a very positive effect on patients with mystery symptoms, a new study from the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Exeter reveals. The study examined 80 patients, with nearly 60 percent reporting musculoskeletal problems. In the three months prior to the experiment, the subjects accounted for 44 hospital visits, 52 hospital clinic visits, 106 outpatient clinic visits and 75 visits to non NHS...

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2011-05-13 09:28:20

Olive ridley sea turtles nest in Gabon but spend most of their time in waters off Republic of Congo Satellite tracking of olive ridley sea turtles off the coast of Central Africa has revealed that existing protected areas may be inadequate to safeguard turtles from fishing nets, according to scientists with the University of California-Santa Cruz, the Wildlife Conservation Society, the University of Exeter, and others. Scientists involved in the study recommended the extension of an...