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Latest University of Exeter Stories

2012-06-16 00:53:10

Hope for therapy for both trauma to the peripheral nervous system and for common conditions such as diabetic neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Researchers from the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Exeter, in collaboration with colleagues from Rutgers University, Newark and University College London, have furthered understanding of the mechanism by which the cells that insulate the nerve cells in the peripheral nervous system, Schwann cells, protect and...

2012-05-22 09:00:14

Our 'gut feelings' influence our decisions, overriding 'rational' thought, when we are faced with financial offers that we deem to be unfair, according to a new study. Even when we are set to benefit, our physical response can make us more likely to reject a financial proposition we consider to be unjust. Conducted by a team from the University of Exeter, Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit and University of Cambridge, the research is published today (22 May 2012) in...

2012-04-19 20:16:48

Exercise in the open air is good for you, but if you want to reap the full benefits you should head for the coast or the countryside rather than an urban park. That is the conclusion of research by Katherine Ashbullby and Dr Mathew White from the European Centre for Environment and Human Health (ECEHH), Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, and the School of Psychology, University of Plymouth. Mathew White is presenting the findings today (19 April) to the British Psychological...

2012-04-18 20:09:49

Understanding the damage that pollution causes to both wildlife and human health is set to become much easier thanks to a new green-glowing zebrafish. Created by a team from the University of Exeter, the fish makes it easier than ever before to see where in the body environmental chemicals act and how they affect health. The fluorescent fish has shown that oestrogenic chemicals, which are already linked to reproductive problems, impact on more parts of the body than previously thought....

What Can Ancient Farmers Teach Us About Saving The Amazon?
2012-04-10 10:52:12

For the better part of the last half-century, the Amazonian forests have been plagued by deforestation from human farming activities, and now, new research suggests that farming without the use of fire, like the indigenous populations did in the Pre-Columbian times, could be the key ingredient in feeding people and managing sustainable land in the Amazon and other regions threatened by deforestation. For hundreds of years before Columbus arrived in Central America, indigenous cultures...

Rise Of Land Plants Caused Planet's Temperature To Plummet
2012-02-01 12:50:33

Based on the results of a set of novel new experiments, scientists have theorized that the rise of terrestrial plants in Earth´s natural history may have initiated a series of ice ages that researchers have previously been at a loss to explain. According to the theory, as plants began to take root across the planet´s land masses, they extracted minerals from rocks and absorbed free atmospheric carbon, ultimately precipitating a significant drop in global temperatures....

Turtles' Mating Habits Protect Against Effects Of Climate Change
2012-01-26 04:48:31

The mating habits of marine turtle may help to protect them against the effects of climate change, according to new research led by the University of Exeter. Published Jan 25 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the study shows how the mating patterns of a population of endangered green turtles may be helping them deal with the fact that global warming is leading to a disproportionate number of females being born. The gender of baby turtles is determined by the temperature of...

2012-01-18 12:54:59

The human subconscious has a bigger impact than previously thought on how we respond to danger, according to research led by the University of Exeter. Published today (I8 January), the study shows that our primitive response to fear can contradict our conscious assessment of danger. The findings have implications for how anxiety disorders, such as phobias, are treated. The research also suggests we share a primitive response to fear with other animals, despite being able to consciously...

2012-01-09 13:17:11

Females influence the gender of their offspring so they inherit either their mother's or grandfather's qualities. 'High-quality' females — those which produce more offspring — are more likely to have daughters. Weaker females, whose own fathers were stronger and more successful, produce more sons. The study, by scientists at the University of Exeter (UK), Okayama University and Kyushu University (Japan), is published today (9 January) in the journal Ecology Letters. It shows...

2011-12-07 20:30:32

A 15-minute walk can cut snacking on chocolate at work by half, according to research by the University of Exeter. The study showed that, even in stressful situations, workers eat only half as much chocolate as they normally would after this short burst of physical activity. Published in the journal Appetite, the research suggests that employees may find that short breaks away from their desks can help keen their minds off snacking. In the study, 78 regular chocolate-eaters were invited...


Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.