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Latest University of Exeter Stories

Rise Of Land Plants Caused Planet's Temperature To Plummet
2012-02-01 12:50:33

Based on the results of a set of novel new experiments, scientists have theorized that the rise of terrestrial plants in Earth´s natural history may have initiated a series of ice ages that researchers have previously been at a loss to explain. According to the theory, as plants began to take root across the planet´s land masses, they extracted minerals from rocks and absorbed free atmospheric carbon, ultimately precipitating a significant drop in global temperatures....

Turtles' Mating Habits Protect Against Effects Of Climate Change
2012-01-26 04:48:31

The mating habits of marine turtle may help to protect them against the effects of climate change, according to new research led by the University of Exeter. Published Jan 25 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the study shows how the mating patterns of a population of endangered green turtles may be helping them deal with the fact that global warming is leading to a disproportionate number of females being born. The gender of baby turtles is determined by the temperature of...

2012-01-18 12:54:59

The human subconscious has a bigger impact than previously thought on how we respond to danger, according to research led by the University of Exeter. Published today (I8 January), the study shows that our primitive response to fear can contradict our conscious assessment of danger. The findings have implications for how anxiety disorders, such as phobias, are treated. The research also suggests we share a primitive response to fear with other animals, despite being able to consciously...

2012-01-09 13:17:11

Females influence the gender of their offspring so they inherit either their mother's or grandfather's qualities. 'High-quality' females — those which produce more offspring — are more likely to have daughters. Weaker females, whose own fathers were stronger and more successful, produce more sons. The study, by scientists at the University of Exeter (UK), Okayama University and Kyushu University (Japan), is published today (9 January) in the journal Ecology Letters. It shows...

2011-12-07 20:30:32

A 15-minute walk can cut snacking on chocolate at work by half, according to research by the University of Exeter. The study showed that, even in stressful situations, workers eat only half as much chocolate as they normally would after this short burst of physical activity. Published in the journal Appetite, the research suggests that employees may find that short breaks away from their desks can help keen their minds off snacking. In the study, 78 regular chocolate-eaters were invited...

2011-12-01 01:08:26

Surgeons can learn their skills more quickly if they are taught how to control their eye movements. Research led by the University of Exeter shows that trainee surgeons learn technical surgical skills much more quickly and deal better with the stress of the operating theatre if they are taught to mimic the eye movements of experts. This research, published in the journal Surgical Endoscopy, could transform the way in which surgeons are trained to be ready for the operating theatre....

2011-11-21 09:44:20

We will only achieve the target of limiting global warming to safe levels if carbon dioxide emissions begin to fall within the next two decades and eventually decrease to zero. That is the stark message from research by an international team of scientists, led by the University of Exeter, published today (20 November) in the journal Nature Climate Change. The research focuses on the scale of carbon emission reduction needed to keep future global warming at no more than two degrees Celsius...

2011-11-18 07:06:36

The study suggests an innovative psychological treatment called 'concreteness training' can reduce depression in just two months and could work as a self-help therapy for depression in primary care. Led by the University of Exeter and funded by the Medical Research Council, the research shows how this new treatment could help some of the 3.5 million people in the UK living with depression. People suffering from depression have a tendency towards unhelpful abstract thinking and over-general...

Among Insects, Chivalry Is Not Dead
2011-10-06 14:17:05

[ Watch the Video ] The long-standing consensus of why insects stick together after mating has been turned on its head by scientists from the University of Exeter. Published today (6 October) in Current Biology, their study shows that, contrary to previous thinking, females benefit from this arrangement just as much as males. Instead of dominating their female partners through bullying and aggressive behavior, males were revealed to be protective, even laying their lives on the line...

Turtles Adapt Eggs For Hotter Beaches
2011-09-26 10:52:53

  'Heat-proof' eggs help turtles cope with hot beaches [ Watch the Video ] Sea turtles face an uncertain future as a warming climate threatens to reduce their reproductive viability. However, new research led by the University of Exeter and published this week in Proceedings of the Royal Society B shows that some turtles are naturally heat-tolerant. The study focused on green turtles nesting on Ascension Island, a UK overseas territory in the South Atlantic Ocean. Scientists...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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