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Latest University of Gothenburg Stories

2014-04-07 11:00:15

Despite climate change, most polluters still pay little or nothing when they release carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. 'A cost of USD 0.15 per kilo CO2 would be enough to solve the whole climate change problem', says Thomas Sterner, professor of environmental economics at the University of Gothenburg. Sterner is the only Swedish researcher to serve as a coordinating lead author of a new report that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change will present next week. The third part of...

Sulphur And Iron Haunts The Ghost Wreck
2014-03-05 11:01:04

Carina Eliasson, University of Gothenburg Sulphur and iron accumulation has once again been found in wood samples from old shipwrecks in the Baltic Sea. This time the samples are from the merchant vessel Ghost wreck and the warships Sword and the Crown. Wood samples from the ships have been analyzed by a group of scientists from the University of Gothenburg, Stockholm University and University of Calgary. The results are published in the latest issue of Scientific Reports. Scientists...

Items Found In Ancient Jordanian Settlement Show Cultural Connections With Europe
2014-01-24 12:06:36

University of Gothenburg Swedish archaeologists in Jordan led by Professor Peter M. Fischer from the University of Gothenburg have excavated a nearly 60-metre long well-preserved building from 1100 B.C. in the ancient settlement Tell Abu al-Kharaz. The building is from an era characterized by major migration. New finds support the theory that groups of the so-called Sea Peoples emigrated to Tell Abu al-Kharaz. They derive from Southern or Eastern Europe and settled in the Eastern...

2013-11-21 11:34:57

Food transit through the small intestine affects the body's absorption of nutrients and, consequently, our health. The discovery that food transit time is regulated by a hormone indicates new ways to increase the intestinal absorption of nutrients, and thus potentially treat malnutrition. One of the tasks of the gut microbiota is to break down essential nutrients from our diet to provide a usable energy source in the colon. Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of...

2013-10-15 12:23:47

Allocation of resources in the scientific community is increasingly based on various quantitative indicators. One of the most important indicators of scientific quality is how often research is cited. However, a new doctoral thesis in theory of science from the University of Gothenburg shows that the number of citations is a poor measurement of the quality of research. 'Citations occur when a researcher provides a reference to previous research results to for example back up a claim....

2013-10-15 12:04:57

Democracy aid can contribute to change, but only marginally and only under certain conditions. This is the conclusion of a new doctoral thesis from the University of Gothenburg. Since the early 1990s, democracy and human rights have become increasingly important in the field of international development assistance. Democracy aid includes, for example, support to political parties, parliaments, election authorities, ombudsman offices and civil society organizations promoting human rights....

Evidence Of Luxury Textile Production And Extraction Of Copper From Unknown Part Of Cypriote Bronze Age City
2013-09-04 07:21:55

University of Gothenburg A Swedish archaeological expedition from the University of Gothenburg has excavated a previously unknown part of the Bronze Age city Hala Sultan Tekke (around 1600–1100 BC). The finds include a facility for extraction of copper and production of bronze objects, evidence of production of luxurious textiles, as well as ceramics and other objects imported from all over the Mediterranean but also from central Europe. ‘One of our conclusions is that the Bronze...

2013-06-26 20:43:32

The citizens of Gothenburg, Sweden will vote soon on whether to continue the already up-and-running congestion charge. New research from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, shows that congestion charges are indeed a better way to reduce traffic and improve air quality. The doctoral thesis from the School of Business, Economics and Law shows that in Bogota, Colombia drastic driving restrictions have not been effective, while congestion charges besides cutting traffic, as it has happened...

2013-06-26 16:54:05

The knees are the body part that is injured the most by dinghy sailors. The injuries are primarily due to overstrain and most often occur during physical training. This was shown in a study at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. "Studies have been made on the risk of injury for many sports, but not for dinghy sailing. With more knowledge, we can create recommendations that will prevent sailors from getting injured," says Lena Bøymo-Having, who conducted the study at the...

2013-06-26 16:51:32

Both the UK and Canada have experienced huge falls in diabetes-related mortality since the mid-1990s, with the result that the gap in mortality risk between those with and without diabetes has narrowed substantially. The findings are in new research published in Diabetologia, the Journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), and written by Dr Marcus Lind, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden and colleagues. A previous review of studied investigated...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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