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Latest University of Gothenburg Stories

Tiny Worm May Be Earliest Human Progenitor
2013-03-28 07:36:44

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A little worm, the Xenoturbella bocki, is causing a lot of contention amongst scientists debating whether it truly was the ancestor of mankind.  A new study involving the University of Gothenburg and the Gothenburg Natural History Museum indicates that the worm is indeed mankind's progenitor. Xenoturbella bocki is a one-centimeter-long worm built on a simple body plan that lacks a brain, sexual organs and other vital organs. It...

Less Children Mean Longer Life?
2013-03-27 15:57:55

University of Gothenburg New research into ageing processes, based on modern genetic techniques, confirms theoretical expectations about the correlation between reproduction and lifespan. Studies of birds reveal that those that have offspring later in life and have fewer broods live longer. And the decisive factor is telomeres, shows research from The University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Telomeres are the protective caps at the end of chromosomes. The length of telomeres influences how...

2013-02-19 12:24:39

Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, show that cholesterol metabolism is regulated by bacteria in the small intestine. These findings may be important for the development of new drugs for cardiovascular disease. It is well established that cholesterol is the major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Cholesterol — which is mainly synthesized in the body but also obtained from dietary sources — is converted to bile acids in the liver,...

2013-02-19 12:17:49

Weight-loss surgery is currently only offered to patients who exceed a certain BMI. However, surgical intervention could improve the health of many more people. This is shown by the Swedish Obese Subjects study carried out at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, involving 104 patients who were operated on despite their BMI being "too low". As a result, the risk of developing diabetes was reduced by 67 percent. In order to meet the current selection criteria for...

Other Plants Survive Harsh Environments With Help From Cushion Plants
2013-02-19 10:09:53

University of Gothenburg Alpine cushion plants help other plants in harsh mountain environments to survive. This is shown by new research involving researchers from the University of Gothenburg, the results of which are now being publishing in the highly respected journal Ecology Letters. Cushion plants are a type of plant found in areas such as Arctic environments, and are characterized by their distinctive, round, cushion-like shape. A new study highlights the strong interaction...

2012-11-13 10:23:22

Traditional Swedish bonad paintings can contain toxic substances such as arsenic, reveals new research from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, in which painting conservator and conservation scientist Ingalill Nyström analyzed the paint and techniques used in the traditional painted wall hangings from southern Sweden. Previous research into bonad painting has always originated in the humanities, from an art/cultural history perspective. Bonad paintings are painted wall...

2012-11-13 10:21:51

Couples who adopt after unsuccessful IVF treatment have a better quality of life than both childless couples and couples without fertility problems, reveals a study from the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. A research group comprising midwives and doctors at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, studied quality of life five years after IVF treatment in 979 men and women in the Västra Götaland region. The study compared...

2012-11-02 14:52:12

With active surveillance many men with prostate cancer could dispense with radiation treatment and surgery, and thus avoid adverse effects such as incontinence and impotence. This is the outcome of a study of almost 1,000 men diagnosed with prostate cancer conducted at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. The introduction of PSA tests, which are used to screen for prostate cancer, offers early tumor detection, reducing mortality rates. At the same time, prostate cancer is...

2012-10-26 00:43:38

In the 1700s-1800s, dysentery was a disease causing many deaths. In fact, in some areas in Sweden 90 percent of all deaths were due to dysentery during the worst outbreaks. A new doctoral thesis in history from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, presents demographic and medical history of the disease. Dysentery, or rödsot as it used to be called in Swedish, remains a major problem in developing countries. In the Western world, however, the disease is almost gone. Yet prior...

Sweden’s Säcken Reef Facing Death
2012-10-23 21:13:37

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online The Säcken reef in the Koster Fjord in Sweden is that country´s last remaining cold-water coral reef and it is under a distinct threat of extinction. Like the more common warm-water reefs, cold-water reefs are known for their rich biological diversity. With the Säcken reef in distress, researchers from the University of Gothenburg have started a restoration project extracting healthy corals...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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