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Latest University of Illinois Stories

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2010-07-08 09:50:20

Although global grain production must double by 2050 to address rising population and demand, new data from the University of Illinois suggests crop yields will suffer unless new approaches to adapt crop plants to climate change are adopted. Improved agronomic traits responsible for the remarkable increases in yield accomplished during the past 50 years have reached their ceiling for some of the world's most important crops. "Global change is happening so quickly that its impact on...

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2010-06-29 07:50:13

Events occurring during the development of an infant's brain can leave behind fingerprints. And researchers at the University of Illinois are interested in learning how these fingerprints can predict future behavioral problems such as cognitive deficits, anxiety disorders, depression, and even autism. New U of I research shows that the baby pig may provide some answers. Researchers discovered that neonatal piglets are capable of being trained in traditional learning and memory tests. As a...

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2010-06-24 14:11:31

Human-driven changes in the earth's atmospheric composition are likely to alter plant diseases of the future. Researchers predict carbon dioxide will reach levels double those of the preindustrial era by the year 2050, complicating agriculture's need to produce enough food for a rapidly growing population. University of Illinois researchers are studying the impact of elevated carbon dioxide, elevated ozone and higher atmospheric temperatures on plant diseases that could challenge crops in...

2010-06-24 04:25:33

Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe and is a major component of giant planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. But not much is known about what happens to this abundant element under high-pressure conditions when it transforms from one state to another. Using quantum simulations, scientists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of L'Aquia in Italy were able to uncover these phase transitions in the...

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2010-06-22 11:35:09

A few sturdy species of weed are proving to be a fair fight for Roundup weed killer. At least 10 weed species are withstanding the blow of Roundup in at least 22 states.  Some of the species, such as Palmer amaranth in Arkansas and water hemp and marestail in Illinois, grow fast and big, producing tens of thousands of seeds. "It's getting to be a big deal," Mike Plumer told the Associated Press (AP). Plumer, a 61-year-old farmer and University of Illinois agronomist who grows soybeans...

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2010-06-22 07:21:22

Like an unwelcome houseguest or itinerant squatter, the human body louse shows up when times are bad and always makes them worse. Now a multi-institutional team reports that it has sequenced the body louse genome, an achievement that will yield new insights into louse "“ and human "“ biology and evolution. The study, which also sequenced the genome of a microbe that lives inside the body louse, appears in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Thanks to its tenacity, the...

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2010-06-17 07:43:41

Researchers have found antibiotic-resistant bacteria in seven species of sharks and redfish captured in waters off Belize, Florida, Louisiana and Massachusetts. Most of these wild, free-swimming fish harbored several drug-resistant bacterial strains. The study, published in the Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine, found antibiotic-resistant bacteria in every fish species sampled. The researchers also found multidrug-resistant bacteria in fish at nearly all of the study sites, said Mark...

2010-05-27 10:35:20

Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed a new, more accurate method of calculating the change in greenhouse gas emissions that results from changes in land use. The new approach, described in the journal Global Change Biology, takes into account many factors not included in previous methods, the researchers report. There is an urgent need to accurately assess whether particular land-use projects will increase or decrease greenhouse gas emissions, said Kristina...

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2010-05-20 09:25:28

Thanks to a new semiconductor manufacturing method pioneered at the University of Illinois, the future of solar energy just got brighter. Although silicon is the industry standard semiconductor in most electronic devices, including the photovoltaic cells that solar panels use to convert sunlight into energy, it is hardly the most efficient material available. For example, the semiconductor gallium arsenide and related compound semiconductors offer nearly twice the efficiency as silicon in...

2010-05-18 08:19:01

If you're debating about what impatiens to plant in your yard, a recent study at the University of Illinois suggests that you go with Cajun Carmine, that is if you want fewer insects in your garden. Why some varieties of the popular bedding plant impatiens attract more thrips than others was one of the questions graduate student Katie Yu investigated. "The fragrances given off by flowers are actually complex compounds known as plant volatiles, some of which cannot be detected by humans," Yu...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.