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Latest University of London Stories

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2011-01-19 09:27:52

One of the most important predictions of Einstein's theory of General Relativity is the existence of black holes. The dynamics of these systems are not yet fully understood, but researchers from Queen Mary, University of London have now provided a rigorous way of determining the evolutionary stage of a black hole by analysing the region outside where matter cannot escape, the event horizon. Dr Thomas Bäckdahl and Dr Juan A. Valiente Kroon at Queen Mary's School of Mathematical Sciences...

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2010-12-13 08:30:00

Researchers from Imperial College London and Queen Mary, University of London have created an online database that allows users to see flower colors through the eyes of a bee. The database, which is entitled the Floral Reflectance Database (FReD), is referenced in the latest edition of the journal PLoS One as "a valuable new tool for researchers interested in the colors of flowers and their association with pollinator color vision, containing raw spectral reflectance data for a large number...

2010-12-08 22:05:26

Researchers from Queen Mary, University of London (UK) and the University of Fribourg (Switzerland) have shown that a magnetically polarised current can be manipulated by electric fields. Published this week in the journal Nature Materials, this important discovery opens up the prospect of simultaneously processing and storing data on electrons held in the molecular structure of computer chips - combining computer memory and processing power on the same chip. "This is especially exciting, as...

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2010-09-01 06:30:00

A new study claims to debunk the theory that mammoths, giant bears and other large mammals in North America were wiped out by a space impact 13,000 years ago. Scientists have long theorized that these large beasts, which disappeared quickly from the fossil record, were killed off by a comet or asteroid strike. But researchers now say that the tiny diamonds believed to have been created in the collision may have been misconstrued. Without these diamonds, the theory falls apart, they say. "This...

2010-08-02 20:37:56

Scientists have developed a material for bone grafts that could one day replace the 'gold standard' natural bone implants. A new study shows how particles of a ceramic called calcium phosphate have the ability to stimulate promising bone regrowth by attracting stem cells and 'growth factors' to promote healing and the integration of the grafted tissue. "The rate of bone repair we see with these materials rivals that of traditional grafts using a patients' own bone," said Professor Joost de...

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2010-07-30 12:46:28

The 318-million-year-old reptile footprints were found in sea-cliffs on the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, Canada. They show that reptiles were the first vertebrates (animals with a backbone) to conquer dry continental interiors. These pioneers paved the way for the diverse ecosystems that exist on land today. The footprints were discovered by Dr Howard Falcon-Lang of Royal Holloway, University of London. The results of his study, undertaken with Professor Mike Benton of the University of...

2010-07-09 14:11:45

A sophisticated new analysis of team tactics predicts a Spanish win in Sunday's FIFA World Cup final and also shows why England were beaten by Germany. Mathematicians and football supporters Dr Javier L³pez Peña and Dr Hugo Touchette from Queen Mary, University of London have collected ball passing data from all of the FIFA World Cup games and analyzed it to reveal the nations' different styles of play. Using the mathematical technique called Graph Theory, they have...

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2010-06-30 11:14:05

Research by scientists at Queen Mary, University of London has found that a predicted rise in global temperature of 4°C by 2100 could lead to a 13% reduction in ecosystems' ability to absorb carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere. Writing in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, the scientists describe a new model to predict how the carbon storage capacity of ecosystems would respond to future global warming. They tested their predictions against data collected from...

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2010-06-05 06:50:00

Ever wondered how cockroaches seem to know the best place to grab a meal? New research at Queen Mary, University of London suggests that, just like humans, they share their local knowledge of the best food sources and follow 'recommendations' from others. It is often striking how little we know about our closest neighbor. Until now, it was assumed that cockroaches forage on their own to find food and water. However, this work shows how groups of the insects seem to make a collective choice...

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2010-05-30 09:30:00

Scientists say that bumblebees' distinctive bright yellow and black stripes may not be what is keeping them safe from their enemies. A U.K. study has discovered that other aspects of bees' behavior may matter more than the classic bee color to keep predators away. The scientists told BBC News that a bee predator's true deterrent could be the way the bumblebees fly or perhaps the buzzing sound they make. The study was published in the Journal of Zoology. Scientists have long believed that...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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