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Latest University of London Stories

2012-03-26 14:34:14

Researchers at Queen Mary, University of London have identified a new protein that makes pancreatic cancer cells less 'sticky' and therefore less able to attach to and invade other tissue. The protein, known as S100PBP, does this by suppressing a second protein called cathepsin Z. The research team has shown that cathepsin Z makes pancreatic cancer cells sticky, allowing them to spread to their surrounding environment. Prior to this study nothing was known about the function of S100PBP in...

2012-03-12 11:18:18

Scientists discover protein and move a step closer to preventing cardiovascular disease Researchers from Queen Mary, University of London and the University of Surrey have found a protein inside blood vessels with an ability to protect the body from substances which cause cardiovascular disease. The findings, published online in the journal Cardiovascular Research, have revealed the protein pregnane X receptor (PXR) can switch on different protective pathways in the blood vessels....

2012-03-06 11:03:47

Lake Naivasha provides natural experiment to investigate interaction between carp and crayfish Louisiana red swamp crayfish and common carp are two of the most invasive species on the planet yet how they interact has only recently been revealed by scientists at Queen Mary, University of London. The study, published in the online journal PLoS ONE, investigated the interaction between the crayfish and carp in Kenya's Lake Naivasha between 2001 and 2008. The crayfish were introduced to...

2012-03-05 22:48:40

A study by researchers at Queen Mary, University of London and Barts and The London NHS Trust proves that HGVs pose the greatest risk of death and serious injury to cyclists. A number of high profile campaigns have highlighted the vulnerability of cyclists on our city roads but very little evidence exists to back up these campaigns and to show how deaths and injuries can be prevented. The new study is the first of its kind to show the types and severity of injuries caused by collisions...

The Red Planet Experiences 'Marsquakes'
2012-02-22 11:49:17

University of London researchers report they have found evidence that Mars experiences "marsquakes" in the same way Earth does with an earthquake. The researchers said the existence of marsquakes is an indication that conditions on Mars could include liquid water. The team from the University of London used High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) imagery to examine a fault system known as Cerberus Fossae. They analyzed the way boulders had fallen and rolled during...

2012-02-17 11:05:09

Researchers from Queen Mary, University of London are aiming to improve the health of Londoners by combining a century-old mapping technique with up-to-the-minute technology. Using type 2 diabetes as their example, the researchers have compiled detailed maps of east London highlighting the geographical 'hotspots' of disease risk. The maps, which are published today in BMJ Open reveal startling similarities to the renowned 'poverty maps' created in the late 19th Century by Victorian...

2012-02-16 13:01:16

The ability to change vocal sounds (vocal plasticity) and develop an accent is potentially far more widespread in mammals than previously believed, according to new research on goats from Queen Mary, University of London. Vocal plasticity is the ability of an individual to modify the sound of their voice according to their social environment. Humans benefit from an extreme form of vocal plasticity which allows us to produce a wide range of sounds and accents, but in most other mammals...

Bumblebees Learn To Take Cues From Honeybees
2012-02-15 04:29:01

Bumblebees can use cues from their rivals the honeybees to learn where the best food resources are, according to new research from Queen Mary, University of London. Writing in the journal PLoS ONE, the team from Queen Mary's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences explain how they trained a colony of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) to use cues provided by a different species, the honeybee (Apis mellifera), as well as cues provided by fellow bumblebees to locate food resources on...

2012-02-10 11:37:39

Scientists from Queen Mary, University of London have discovered the workings behind some of the bacteria that kill hundreds of thousands every year, possibly paving the way for new antibiotics that could treat infections more effectively. With antibiotic resistance on the rise in strains of pathogenic bacteria, innovative strategies are needed to discover ways of treating bacterial infections in both humans and in agriculture. Writing in the journal PLoS Pathogens, the team from Queen...

2012-02-10 11:36:21

How to catch a killer weed Invasive species which have the potential to destroy biodiversity and influence global change could be tracked and controlled in the same way as wanted criminals, according to new research from Queen Mary, University of London. Geographic profiling (GP) was originally developed as a statistical tool in criminology, where it uses the locations of linked crimes (for example murder, rape or arson) to identify the predicted location of the offender's residence....


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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