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Latest University of New South Wales Stories

Nuclear Clock Keeps Time With The Universe
2012-03-10 05:58:16

As time passes, new technology evolves in order to keep time. Soon the trusty atomic clock may be replaced by a nuclear clock, which keeps time to 1/20th of a second in 14 billion years. In early time, the sun or grains of sand in an hourglass kept time. Over the years technology allowed for clocks you could wind, watches with quartz oscillators, and more recently the atomic clock. The atomic clock uses an electronic transition frequency to keep time. Considered quite accurate, atomic...

Image 1 - Researchers Create Working Single-Atom Transistor
2012-02-20 05:35:23

[ Watch the Video ] A team of Australian and American researchers announced on Sunday that they had created a working transistor from a single phosphorus atom embedded precisely in a silicon crystal. The transistor was completed by physicists at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), the University of Melbourne, and Purdue University, and according to a UNSW press release, this "remarkable feat of micro-engineering“¦ uses as its active component an individual phosphorus...

2012-01-23 13:26:12

Physicists at the University of New South Wales have observed a new kind of interaction that can arise between electrons in a single-atom silicon transistor. The findings, to be published this week in the journal Physical Review Letters, offer a more complete understanding of the mechanisms for electron transport in nanostructures at the atomic level. "We have been able to study some of the most complicated transport mechanisms that can arise up to the single atom level," says lead...

2012-01-06 09:49:02

The smallest wires ever developed in silicon - just one atom tall and four atoms wide - have been shown by a team of researchers from the University of New South Wales, Melbourne University and Purdue University to have the same current-carrying capability as copper wires. Experiments and atom-by-atom supercomputer models of the wires have found that the wires maintain a low capacity for resistance despite being more than 20 times thinner than conventional copper wires in microprocessors....

2012-01-06 09:45:06

Silicon links shrink to atomic scale     The narrowest conducting wires in silicon ever produced are shown to have the same electrical current carrying capability as copper, as published in Science.     This means electrical interconnects in silicon can be shrunk to the atomic-scale without losing their functionality — Ohm's law holds true at the atomic-scale.     UNSW researchers will use these wires to address individual atoms —...

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2011-12-03 08:17:02

A drastic decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels appears to have been the catalyst that led to the formation of the Antarctic ice sheet, according to a new study published December 1 in the journal Science. The research, which was completed by an international team of experts led by Mark Pagani of Yale University, "helps solve a long-standing scientific puzzle and confirms the power of CO2 to dramatically alter global climate," according to a Thursday press release from the...

2011-09-21 14:40:17

Humor therapy is as effective as widely used antipsychotic drugs in managing agitation in patients with dementia — and avoids serious drug side effects, a new study to be presented this week at the National Dementia Research Forum shows. The first major study of the impact of humor therapy on mood, agitation, behavioral disturbances and social engagement in dementia patients found both short term and persisting decrease in agitation, according to lead researcher, Dr Lee-Fay Low, a...

2011-09-13 12:15:56

Isolation of hepatitis C 'founder virus' reveals weakest links in virus makeup Hopes for an effective vaccine and treatment against the potentially fatal hepatitis C virus (HCV) have received a major boost following the discovery of two 'Achilles' heels' within the virus. A team of medical researchers from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) studied individuals at high risk of HCV infection, including a number identified within a few weeks of the onset of infection. Using a new...

Image 1 - Tasmanian Tiger Not To Blame For Killing Sheep
2011-09-01 08:06:14

  Hunted to extinction in the early twentieth century for allegedly being a killer of sheep, Australia´s iconic Thylacine, also known as the Tasmanian tiger because of its striped back, has been found not guilty in a new study published in the Zoological Society of London´s Journal of Zoology. “Our research has shown that its rather feeble jaw restricted it to catching smaller, more agile prey,” said lead author Marie Attard, of the University of New South...

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2011-08-03 08:05:58

Eight out of ten Australians would radically change their risky behavior if tests showed they had a genetic susceptibility to depression, a national study has found. The study, conducted by researchers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) and published online in the Journal of Affective Disorders, is the first population-wide analysis of Australian attitudes towards genetic testing for risk of mental illness. There was overwhelming support for the use of genetic tests to help people...


Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
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