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Latest University of Pennsylvania School Stories

Measuring Creatine Levels With MRI Has Benefits Over Contrast-enhanced MRI And MRS
2014-01-13 07:30:49

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine A new MRI method to map creatine at higher resolutions in the heart may help clinicians and scientists find abnormalities and disorders earlier than traditional diagnostic methods, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania suggest in a new study published online today in Nature Medicine. The preclinical findings show an advantage over less sensitive tests and point to a safer and more cost-effective...

Isolating RNA From Live Cells In Their Natural Tissue Environment
2014-01-13 07:23:08

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Findings allow for better understanding of how tissue microenvironment affects gene expression in healthy and diseased cells A multi-disciplinary team from the University of Pennsylvania have published in Nature Methods a first-of-its-kind way to isolate RNA from live cells in their natural tissue microenvironment without damaging nearby cells. This allows the researchers to analyze how cell-to-cell chemical connections influence individual...

Genetically Modified Cells Produce Long-term Remissions
2013-12-09 06:46:50

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Three and a half years after beginning a clinical trial which demonstrated the first successful and sustained use of genetically engineered T cells to fight leukemia, a research team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will today announce the latest results of studies involving both adults and children with advanced blood cancers that have failed to respond to...

Biorhythm Of Brown Fat Has Implications For Combating Obesity, Associated Diabetes And Heart Disease
2013-10-28 10:24:36

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine For nearly 300 years, investigators have known that body temperature follows a circadian, or 24-hour, rhythm, with a peak during the day and a low at night. The benefit of this control during evolution may have been to allow conservation of energy while sleeping because keeping body temperature above the surrounding temperature requires heat production from metabolic processes inside the body. But, it is also critical to be able to adapt to...

Common Stem Cell In Development Of Heart And Lungs Explains Adaption For Life On Land
2013-07-23 09:39:06

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine The evolution of adaptations for life on land have long puzzled biologists -- are feathers descendents of dinosaur scales, how did arms and legs evolve from fins, and from what ancient fish organ did the lung evolve? Biologists have known that the co-development of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems is a recent evolutionary adaption to life outside of water, coupling the function of the heart with the gas exchange function of the lung....

Food-induced Allergic Inflammation In The Esophagus Promoted By Rare Immune Cells
2013-07-23 09:29:59

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Implications for treating some common food allergies Food is an integral part of life; but, for some, it can be harmful. Allergic inflammation caused by inappropriate immune responses to some types of food has become a major public health issue. Over the past ten years, the prevalence of food allergies has increased by nearly 20 percent, affecting an estimated six million people in the U.S. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a food...

Molecular Key To Exhaustion Following Sleep Deprivation Found By Researchers
2013-03-07 15:37:28

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine It happens to everyone: You stay up late one night to finish an assignment, and the next day, you're exhausted. Humans aren't unique in that; all animals need sleep, and if they don't get it, they must make it up. The biological term for that pay-the-piper behavior is "sleep homeostasis," and now, thanks to a research team at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, one of the molecular players in this process has been...

2012-04-26 09:15:16

Choosing the right hospital may make the difference between life and death for very low birth weight infants, according to research led by the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing and released today in JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association. In a comprehensive study of 72,235 infants born in 558 hospitals across the nation, the researchers found that babies cared for in hospitals with the Magnet credential were less likely to die, acquire a hospital-based infection,...

2012-03-21 13:58:08

In one of the largest studies of its kind, a consortium of investigators from 13 countries led the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing in the U.S. and the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium in Europe, found that nurses who reported better working conditions in hospitals and less likelihood of leaving also had patients who were more satisfied with their hospital stay and rated their hospitals more highly. The study was released today in the current issue of the prestigious British...

2012-01-18 00:11:47

With the prodding of new federal legislation, electronic health records (EHRs) are rapidly becoming part of the daily practice of hospital nurses — the frontline providers of care. In the first large study of its kind, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing determined that nurses working with EHRs consistently reported more improvements to nursing care and better health outcomes for patients than nurses working in hospitals without this technology. A study of...