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Latest University of Pennsylvania School Stories

2005-08-18 14:25:00

Philadelphia, PA -- Otters cavorting in the water is a scene with which we're all familiar. Yet, unlike many other mammals that spend a considerable amount of time in the water"“polar bears, seals, dolphins, and whales"“river otters do not have a thick layer of body fat to keep warm. They rely, instead, on a few unique adaptations; namely, their fur and the densely packed layer of specially adapted underhairs. Using scanning electron microscopy and polarizing light...

2005-08-10 01:19:06

In a commentary piece in the August 10th issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, Scott D. Halpern, MD, PhD, of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, calls for a revision of existing state laws so that HIV-testing may be carried out when patients are not able to give their direct consent for such testing. The paper is entitled, "HIV Testing without Consent in Critically Ill Patients." At present, except for tests for heritable genetic disorders, HIV is the only...

2005-08-01 19:15:11

(Philadelphia, PA) - Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine found that a protein called NF-Ya activates several genes known to regulate the development of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), or blood-producing stem cells, in bone marrow. Knowing the details of this pathway may one day lead to new treatments for such blood diseases as leukemia, as well as a better understanding of how HSCs work in the context of bone-marrow and peripheral-stem-cell transplantation. The...

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2005-08-01 18:44:00

(Philadelphia, PA) - Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have found that inhibitors of an enzyme called cathepsin L prevent the SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) virus from entering target cells. SARS is caused by an emergent coronavirus. There is no effective treatment at this time. This study also demonstrates a new mechanism for how viral proteins are activated within host cells, states senior author Paul Bates, PhD, an Associate Professor in the...

2005-07-08 18:50:00

(Philadelphia, PA) - Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have determined how serotonin decreases the body's sensitivity to light and that exposure to constant darkness leads to a decrease in serotonin levels in the brain of fruit flies. These findings suggest that serotonin may play a role in maintaining circadian rhythm, as well as modulating light-related disorders such as seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Senior author Amita Sehgal, PhD, Professor of...

2005-06-23 19:20:00

(Philadelphia, PA) - For the first time ever, using "laser tweezers," the mechanical properties of an individual fiber in a blood clot have been determined by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Their work, led by John W. Weisel, PhD, Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology at Penn, and published in this week\'s early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides a basis for understanding how the elasticity of the whole clot...

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2005-06-01 06:44:36

Almost 47 million Americans don't have rapid access to specialized trauma treatment centers should they get hurt in a serious accident, a national survey finds. The problem is worst in thinly populated rural areas, but a lack of coordinated planning means access is also limited in some urban areas, according to a report in the June 1 Journal of the American Medical Association. Trauma centers, which differ from emergency rooms because they specialize in treatment of injuries, are listed in...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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