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Latest University of Pennsylvania School Stories

2011-01-13 14:04:43

Discovery could influence development of new HDL-targeted therapies The discovery that high levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (the "good cholesterol") is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease has fostered intensive research to modify HDL levels for therapeutic gain. However, recent findings have called into question the notion that pharmacologic increases in HDL cholesterol levels are necessarily beneficial to patients. Now, a new study from researchers at...

2011-01-04 14:31:30

Given the amount of angst over male pattern balding, surprisingly little is known about its cause at the cellular level. In a new study, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, a team led by George Cotsarelis, MD, chair of the Department of Dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, has found that stem cells play an unexpected role in explaining what happens in bald scalp. Using cell samples from men undergoing hair transplants, the team compared follicles...

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2010-12-23 08:02:49

Implications for blocking metastasis and improving responses to existing therapies Overexpression or hyperactivation of ErbB cell-surface receptors drives the growth of many breast cancers. Drugs, like Herceptin, that block the receptors' signals halt tumor progression in some patients. However, not all patients' tumors respond, with some becoming resistant over time. Different drugs that interfere with other steps in the signaling pathway may improve the response of patients, yet little is...

2010-12-09 13:30:53

Penn study: Slowly progressive weight-training program reduces chances of developing painful side effect by as much as 70 percent Weightlifting may play a key role in the prevention of the painful limb-swelling condition lymphedema following breast cancer treatment, according to new research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Combined with the team's previous findings that the exercise limits a worsening of symptoms among women who already have lymphedema, the new data...

2010-12-07 13:55:12

Penn-led research points to new ways to identify patients who are most likely to respond to cancer vaccine treatment A personalized vaccine is a powerful therapy to prevent recurrence among certain follicular lymphoma patients, according to the latest results of ongoing research led by the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. The new findings show that when these patients "“ whose tumors are marked by a specific protein that may be present in up to half of people with this...

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2010-11-30 06:30:00

A new study suggests that skipping breakfast may not change how much food a kid eats throughout the rest of the day. However, the researchers said that missing breakfast could still carry consequences. Some evidence suggests that skipping breakfast could lead kids to overeat at later meals and eventually pack on extra pounds.  But lead researcher Tanja Kral of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine told Reuters Health that few studies have rigorously tested whether that is...

2010-10-19 14:27:00

Penn study measures the collaborative nature of translational medicine Taking a cue from the world of business-performance experts and baseball talent scouts, Penn Medicine translational medicine researchers are among the first to find a way to measure the productivity of collaborations in a young, emerging institute. They published their findings the most recent issue of Science Translational Medicine. While metrics exist to measure the contributions of individual scientists, judging the...

2010-10-15 17:13:40

Implications for autoimmune and neurological diseases How a T cell decides to make protein X, Y, or Z can have profound effects for fighting foreign invaders or staving off dire autoimmune reactions. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have identified the steps that control how different forms of an immune cell protein called CD45, which is critical for activating the immune system when faced with pathogens, are controlled in the arc of a body's immune response....

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2010-09-20 07:52:26

Crosstalk between ion channels points to new therapeutic strategy, Penn study finds The lab of Kevin Foskett, PhD, the Isaac Ott Professor of Physiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, has found a possible new target for fighting cystic fibrosis (CF) that could compensate for the lack of a functioning ion channel in affected CF-related cells. Their finding appears in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The team explored the role of CFTR, the chloride ion channel...

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2010-07-28 09:05:13

Defining of novel mechanism informs understanding of cancer, aging physiology University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine  researchers have described a previously unknown biological mechanism in cells that prevents them from cannibalizing themselves for fuel. The mechanism involves the fuel used by cells under normal conditions and relies on an ongoing transfer of calcium between two cell components via an ion channel. Without this transfer, cells start consuming themselves as a way of...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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