Quantcast

Latest University of Pennsylvania School Stories

2010-07-08 12:57:15

Penn study finds left-to-right readers more likely to call foul for right-to-left attacks Soccer referees may have an unconscious bias towards calling fouls based on a play's direction of motion, according to a new study from the of University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Researchers found that soccer experts made more foul calls when action moved right-to-left, or leftward, compared to left-to-right or rightward action, suggesting that two referees watching the same play from...

2010-07-06 12:11:05

New strategy holds promise for fewer patient side effects A novel therapy designed to attack tumors in patients with a genetic mutation in either BRCA1 or BRCA2, slowed tumor growth in 85 percent of advanced breast cancer patients treated in a small study, researchers report in the July 6 issue of the Lancet. "That is really an enormous response rate in a population of patients who have received a median of three prior therapies," says study co-author Susan M. Domchek, MD, associate professor...

2010-06-11 08:10:00

An Ethical and Clinical Exploration of the Pros & Cons of Robotic Surgery PHILADELPHIA, June 11 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Robotic surgery -- is it truly an advance for modern medicine, or just a product of slick consumer advertising campaigns and targeted marketing to physicians? Advocates say robots help surgeons perform surgery with greater access, visibility and precision all which reduce pain and blood loss, shortening hospital stays and ultimately getting patients back to work...

2010-06-02 13:37:06

Using high-throughput sequencing to map the locations of a common type of jumping gene within a person's entire genome, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine found extensive variation in these locations among the individuals they studied, further underscoring the role of these errant genes in maintaining genetic diversity. The investigators determined that any two peoples' genomes differ at roughly 285 sites out of the 1139 sites studied. These results were found by...

94af112323d691077bf1d3c3c3710ca81
2010-05-18 07:13:09

Stages from Early to Mature Cell Offer Clues for Anti-Obesity Drug Development, Penn Researchers Report Getting from point A to B may sound simple, but not so in the formation of fat cells. In a finding with potential drug-development implications, Mitchell A. Lazar, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Institute for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and colleagues report in the current issue of Genes & Development the discovery of an...

2010-05-11 12:06:00

So often the rare informs the common. Penn researchers investigating a regulatory protein involved in a rare genetic disease have shown that it may be related to epileptic and autistic symptoms in other more common neurological disorders. A team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, led by Peter B. Crino, MD, PhD, associate professor of Neurology and director of the Penn Epilepsy Center, demonstrate how mutations in the STRAD-alpha gene can cause a disease...

2010-04-14 23:01:00

Penn Also Stands among the Top Five Nationally for Pediatrics, Women's Health, Internal Medicine and Drug/Alcohol Abuse PHILADELPHIA, April 15 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine has been ranked #2 among the nation's research-oriented medical schools, according to the annual survey by U.S. News & World Report, rising from #3 in last year's survey. The prestigious survey of the nation's 126 fully-accredited medical schools ranked Harvard...

ac58c717d0b99c441eab336d1f770ca51
2010-04-07 09:20:00

Contrary to popular belief, obese men and women do not receive inferior health care and are just as likely to receive preventative care from doctors, according to a new study. The study, which was completed by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center, followed nearly 70,000 patients who received Medicare benefits or were treated at VA hospitals across the country. As Nanci Hellmich of USA Today reported on...

881458ad61d8f67c5aee2f8d96111d8e1
2010-03-25 08:15:00

Next-Generation Devices Pave Way for Applications in Cardiology, Neurology A team of cardiologists, materials scientists, and bioengineers have created and tested a new type of implantable device for measuring the heart's electrical output that they say is a vast improvement over current devices. The new device represents the first use of flexible silicon technology for a medical application. "We believe that this technology may herald a new generation of active, flexible, implantable devices...

2010-03-18 10:03:00

PHILADELPHIA, March 18 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The University of Pennsylvania and AstraZeneca today announced a new collaborative research agreement to make use of their respective talents and resources in an effort to bridge the transition from drug discovery to development. Initially, the collaboration between Penn Medicine and AstraZeneca scientists will focus on generating new Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug candidates for the clinical development pipeline. In AD, the formation...


Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
Related