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Latest University of Queensland Stories

Robot Aircraft Teach Themselves Which Way Is Up
2011-12-09 08:08:16

[ Video 1 ] | [ Video 2 ] Australian vision scientists today unveiled a novel way to help pilotless aircraft accurately determine their heading and orientation to the ground - by imitating how insects do it. The technology can improve the navigation, flight characteristics and safety for civil and military aircraft, as well as pilotless drones says Mr Richard Moore, a researcher at The Vision Centre and The Queensland Brain Institute at the University of Queensland. “UAVs...

How Do Birds Avoid Crashes?
2011-10-28 04:15:45

The secret of how birds zip flawlessly through narrow spaces without crashing into obstacles has been unlocked by Australian scientists. Their discovery could be used to design ℠bird-safe´ buildings and windmills, and improve the versatility of pilotless aircraft. Researchers at The Vision Centre have found that birds weave rapidly and safely through dense forests and narrow corridors by using their eyes to sense the speed of background image flow on both sides and adjust...

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2011-08-16 12:50:00

Experts say that an hour spent watching television shortens a viewer's life by 22 minutes. Researchers say watching too much TV is as dangerous as smoking or being overweight, and that the "ubiquitous sedentary behavior" should be seen as a "public health problem." Experts from the University of Queensland, Australia, wrote in the British Journal of Sports Medicine: "TV viewing time may have adverse health consequences that rival those of lack of physical activity, obesity and smoking; every...

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2011-05-24 09:35:00

Researchers are developing a language specifically for robots to help them navigate and improve themselves. The Lingodroid research project allows robots to generate random sounds for the places they visit in both simulations and a real office. These sounds are shared and the robots play games to help establish which sound represents which location. The language is so sophisticated that it can be used to help robots find places other robots direct them to. Project leader Dr. Ruth Shulz...

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2011-04-14 14:50:00

According to an Australian study, every year a new song spreads among the male humpback whales. The research published on Thursday in Current Biology said the males are the only humpbacks who sing, mostly likely in hopes of finding a mate. Researchers said that the song of the season has originated off the coast of eastern Australia for the past decade. "Our findings reveal cultural change on a vast scale," Ellen Garland, a graduate student at The University of Queensland, said in a press...

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2011-03-10 11:31:52

A team of researchers from the Royal Veterinary College in London, the University of Idaho, the University of Queensland, and the University of Western Australia are attempting to uncover the precise details of how kangaroos bounce. "The team is interested in trying to understand how the group of kangaroos change their body posture and hopping mechanics with body size," explained Craig McGowan of the University of Idaho. Researchers were loaned a novel motion capture system from the firm...

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2011-03-10 09:43:43

Reports this week that celebrities are earning up to $10,000 per tweet on Micro-blogging site Twitter has caught the attention of ordinary social media users who are now asking how they can make money too. Social media and branding expert at The University of Queensland, Dr Nicholas Carah, says that although celebrities such as Charlie Sheen, who now has 2.3 million followers on Twitter, can attract payments for tweeting product endorsements, non-celebrity individuals can also reap rewards....

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2011-03-09 09:35:30

After years of experimenting with the feces of large cats, a team from the University of Queensland discovered that the feces of tigers is an effective deterrent in warding off animal pests such as goats and kangaroos from certain plants, Associate Professor Peter Murray tells AFP. "While such repellents are typically based on offensive smells like rotten eggs, blood or bone, using tiger poo came from the idea that "if you can smell a predator nearby you would probably want to go somewhere...

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2010-12-28 09:35:00

A specific kind of ancient rock art found in Western Australia has managed to maintain its vivid colorization and high contrast over more than 45,000 years because it is comprised of living organisms, researchers from the University of Queensland have discovered. The Bradshaw rock art, which was named after the 19th century naturalist who first discovered them, has been exposed to sunlight and rain for up to 70,000 years and has never been repainted. Now researchers Jack Pettigrew, Chloe...

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2010-12-02 09:54:33

Australian scientists have developed a novel autopilot that guides aircraft through complex aerobatic maneuvers by watching the horizon like a honey bee. Allowing aircraft to quickly sense which way is "Ëœup' by imitating how honeybees see, engineers and researchers at The Vision Centre, The Queensland Brain Institute and the School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering at The University of Queensland have made it possible for planes to guide themselves through...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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