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Latest University of Queensland Stories

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2010-06-18 08:17:33

Evolutionary potential, edge zones, should be considered as factors Conservation efforts aimed at protecting endangered Caribbean corals may be overlooking regions where corals are best equipped to evolve in response to global warming and other climate challenges. That's the take-home message of a paper published in this week's issue of the journal Science by researchers Ann Budd of the University of Iowa and John Pandolfi of the University of Queensland, Australia. Budd and Pandolfi focus on...

2010-04-12 08:56:48

HIV accounts for a large percentage of deaths, with most deaths concentrated in 6 countries The number of women dying from pregnancy-related causes has dropped by more than 35 percent in the past 30 years "“ from more than a half-million deaths annually in 1980 to about 343,000 in 2008, according to a new study by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington and collaborators at the University of Queensland. IHME's research shows that deaths...

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2010-03-29 06:34:14

The rise in human emissions of carbon dioxide is driving fundamental and dangerous changes in the chemistry and ecosystems of the world's oceans, international marine scientists warned today. "Ocean conditions are already more extreme than those experienced by marine organisms and ecosystems for millions of years," the researchers say in the latest issue of the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution (TREE). "This emphasizes the urgent need to adopt policies that drastically reduce CO2...

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2010-03-01 07:20:00

Fossil corals, up to half a million years old, are providing fresh hope that coral reefs may be able to withstand the huge stresses imposed on them by today's human activity. Reef ecosystems were able to persist through massive environmental changes imposed by sharply falling sea levels during previous ice ages, an international scientific team has found. This provides new hope for their capacity to endure the increasing human impacts forecast for the 21st century. In the world's first study...

2010-02-25 13:50:00

Two species of damselfish may look identical"”not to mention drab"”to the human eye. But that's because, in comparison to the fish, all of us are essentially colorblind. A new study published online on February 25th in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, reveals that the fish can easily tell one species from another based entirely on the shape of the ultraviolet (UV) patterns on their faces. Although scientists have long known that some animals have UV vision, the new...

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2009-12-25 15:20:00

Earlier this year, researchers showed that they could cut the lives of disease-carrying mosquitoes in half by infecting them with a bacterium they took from fruit flies. Now, a new report in the December 24th issue of Cell, a Cell Press publication, suggests that their strategy might do one better: The Wolbachia bacteria also makes the mosquitoes more resistant to infection by viruses that are a growing threat to humans, including those responsible for dengue fever and Chikungunya. Once...

2009-10-29 10:58:00

BRISBANE, Australia, Oct. 29 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Continued robust use of coal and broad deployment of clean coal technologies is crucial for Australia's energy and economic future, according to a multi-disciplinary study released today by The University of Queensland (UQ): "Coal and the Commonwealth." Coal has shaped Australia's history and is essential to its prosperity, creating 20 percent of the nation's mineral wealth, 81 percent of its electricity and the largest coal export...

2009-06-28 07:39:36

While most fans are in awe of what their football heroes can do with a football, the source of their remarkable skill remains strangely mysterious. Although being in excellent physical condition undoubtedly helps, few people actually believe that intense physical training alone can turn an average bloke into a Ronaldo. Now, scientists from the University of Queensland have decided to study what this "something else" might be. Dr. Robbie Wilson will talk about the details of this study and the...

2009-06-11 15:42:10

Resveratrol shows therapeutic potential for cancer chemoprevention as well as cardioprotection. Resveratrol may aid in the prevention of age-related disorders, such as neurodegenerative diseases, inflammation, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Low doses of resveratrol improve cell survival as a component of cardio- and neuro-protection, while high doses increase cell death.   The benefits of alcohol are all about moderation. Low to moderate drinking "“ especially of red...

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2009-06-05 14:40:41

Writing in the peer-reviewed journal Conservation Letters on Friday, researchers noted that a system of selling credits to reduce carbon emissions in the Indonesian rainforest could provide a feasible method of conservation. Authors of the new report stated that paying to reduce rainforest carbon emissions could actually amount to more income than initiatives to use the deforested land for palm oil production. Lead researcher Oscar Venter, from the University of Queensland, focused his study...