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Latest University of Queensland Stories

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2008-11-17 15:20:00

A scientist at the University of Queensland who developed a vaccine for cervical cancer is working on another inoculation against certain types of skin cancer that could be available in five years time. Professor Ian Frazer said tests of the vaccine had proven successful on animals and that human trials could begin next year and a vaccine for children aged 10 to 12 could be available in five to 10 years. The vaccine would protect against squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common skin...

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2008-10-16 09:50:00

University of Arizona scientists experimenting with some of the coldest gases in the universe have discovered that when atoms in the gas get cold enough, they can spontaneously spin up into what might be described as quantum mechanical twisters or hurricanes. The surprising experimental results agree with independent numerical simulations produced by collaborating scientists at the University of Queensland in Australia. The Arizona and Queensland researchers are reporting the results of the...

2008-07-07 18:00:26

XeroCoat, Inc., a pioneering Silicon Valley start-up, today officially announced its entry into the solar energy market. Targeting the solar thermal and solar photovoltaic segments, XeroCoat designs and manufactures a high-performing anti-reflective coating for solar energy systems. Applicable across all solar energy technologies, the XeroCoat anti-reflective coating technology can significantly increase conversion efficiency and, consequently, the power output of solar systems in a very...

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2008-03-20 02:10:00

Mantis shrimp can see the world in a way that had never been observed in any animal before, researchers report in the March 20th Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. The discovery"”which marks the fourth type of visual system"”suggests that the ability to perceive circular polarized light may lend mantis shrimp a secret mode of communication. "Mantis shrimp ventured into a new dimension of vision," said Justin Marshall of the University of Queensland in Australia. Also known...

2008-03-19 11:40:00

University of Queensland researchers will be at the forefront of fighting cancer thanks to a new $3.2 million grant from the Australian Cancer Research Foundation (ACRF). The ACRF funding will allow scientists from UQ's Diamantina Institute for Cancer, Immunology and Metabolic Medicine (DI), and their partners from the Queensland University of Technology, to buy the latest high-tech tools to help them discover genes linked to cancer. "We will be able to sequence nearly a billion DNA bases per...

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2008-02-07 11:00:00

Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) scientists have found another important clue to why nerve cells die in neurodegenerative diseases, based on studies of the developing brain. Neuroscientists at The University of Queensland have just published findings, which add more weight to the "use it or lose it" model for brain function. QBI's Dr Elizabeth Coulson said a baby's brain generates roughly double the number of nerve cells it needs to function; with those cells that receive both chemical and...

2008-01-29 09:00:00

The extraordinary results of an in utero stem cell treatment could lead to a new treatment for babies with brittle bones, as well as a range of other disabling conditions, according to a maternal-fetal medicine researcher, now based at The University of Queensland (UQ). Action Medical Research has announced the outcomes of an Imperial College London study, conducted by a team led by Professor Nicholas Fisk, that could lead to a stem cell treatment for babies with brittle bones - before they...

2005-11-23 13:37:34

Teenagers are more likely to develop drinking problems if their mothers are depressed and drink regularly. The findings come from University of Queensland researchers who tracked alcohol related disorders of children through adulthood as part of one of the world's longest health studies. Data was collected from 2551 Brisbane mothers and their children at six months, five, 14 and 21 years of age. Lead researcher Dr Rosa Alati from UQ's School of Population Health said teenage children of...

2005-11-01 13:25:00

They might prefer to be in front of the TV or Playstation, but Brisbane teenagers are likely to be healthier if they eat meals with mum and dad. University of Queensland researchers working on the world's longest health study found teens who ate regularly with their family were less likely to be overweight. Lead researcher, Dr Abdullah Al Mamun from UQ's School of Population Health said regular family meals could reduce snacking and make for healthier food and social habits. "Eating...

2005-08-16 14:55:00

Overweight children who can shed their puppy fat by age 14 can expect lower blood pressure, according to a University of Queensland study. About 2794 children in Brisbane for the study had their blood pressure and body mass or fat index (weight in kilograms divided by height in metres square) recorded at age five then at 14. Lead researcher, Dr Abdullah Al Mamun from UQ's School of Population Health found children who were overweight at both ages or at age 14, had average blood pressure...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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