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Latest University of Rochester Stories

4364e52009fd14b9ef07a716113c6b0a1
2010-06-23 07:20:37

Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) have discovered yet another reason to filter the foreign white cells from donor blood: the resulting blood product is associated with dramatically fewer cardiopulmonary complications for patients who received a transfusion. The study is published online in the journal, Transfusion. It is the latest in a large body of work led by Neil Blumberg, M.D., who for 25 years has been investigating the benefits of filtering or washing...

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2010-06-10 10:52:50

New therapeutic prospect: Tipping the balance to encourage flu death Scientists have uncovered the flu's secret formula for effectively evolving within and between host species: balance. The key lies with the flu's unique replication process, which has evolved to produce enough mutations for the virus to spread and adapt to its host environment, but not so many that unwanted genomic mutations lead to the flu's demise (catastrophic mutagenesis). These findings overturn long-held assumptions...

2010-06-04 10:48:00

ROCHESTER, N.Y., June 4 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Feeling sluggish? The solution may require getting outside the box - that big brick-and-mortar box called a building. Being outside in nature makes people feel more alive, finds a series of studies published in the June 2010 issue of the Journal of Environmental Psychology. And that sense of increased vitality exists above and beyond the energizing effects of physical activity and social interaction that are often associated with our...

be82df869cd1fa9eecb5ce2829236bd61
2010-06-04 09:15:00

Feeling sluggish? The solution may require getting outside the box "“ that big brick-and-mortar box called a building. Being outside in nature makes people feel more alive, finds a series of studies published in the June 2010 issue of the Journal of Environmental Psychology. And that sense of increased vitality exists above and beyond the energizing effects of physical activity and social interaction that are often associated with our forays into the natural world, the studies show....

2010-06-01 19:26:23

Scientists are making strides against cerebral malaria, a fatal form of malaria in children that can ravage the brain and is extremely difficult to treat. New research points to platelets "“ known for their role in blood clotting "“ as playing an important role in the disease, stimulating the immune system and turning on molecules that increase inflammation. The inflammation leads to the obstruction of blood vessels in the brain, causing brain damage similar to that seen with a...

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2010-05-29 09:35:00

According to research presented Thursday at a New York University conference on games as a learning tool, playing video games might help improve vision and other brain functions. "People that play these fast-paced games have better vision, better attention and better cognition," said Daphne Bavelier, an assistant professor in the department of brain and cognitive science at the University of Rochester. Bavelier was a presenter at Games for Learning, which is a daylong symposium on the...

2010-05-27 09:59:13

Implications for treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome, No. 1 cause of female infertility Male sex hormones, such as testosterone, have well defined roles in male reproduction and prostate cancer. What may surprise many is that they also play an important role in female fertility. A new study finds that the presence and activity of male sex hormones in the ovaries helps regulate female fertility, likely by controlling follicle growth and development and preventing deterioration of...

2010-05-26 09:58:35

HDL cholesterol can transform from good to bad actor in heart disease process We've all heard about the importance of raising HDL, or the so-called "good" cholesterol, and lowering LDL, or "bad" cholesterol, to improve heart health. While we've come to assume HDL cholesterol is an inherently good thing, a new study shows that for a certain group of patients, this is not always the case. The study is the first to find that a high level of the supposedly good cholesterol places a subgroup of...

2010-05-14 13:29:30

70 percent reduction in heart failure; double the benefit of men For women with mild heart failure, device therapy is an extremely attractive option to prevent progression of the disease, according to a study presented today at the Heart Rhythm Society's 31st Annual Scientific Sessions. Women with mild heart disease who had a cardiac resynchronization device combined with a defibrillator (CRT-D) implanted had a 70 percent reduction in heart failure alone and a 72 percent reduction in death...

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2010-05-04 10:25:00

Scientists have uncovered evidence contained within South African rocks which shows that a weak magnetic field was present on Earth nearly 3.5 billion years ago. The evidence in question was found inside of dacite rocks from the Barberton mountain range by University of Rochester professor John Tarduno and a team of researchers. The discovery was presented during the European Geosciences Union conference in Vienna, Austria, and was also the topic of a May 4 article by BBC News science...


Latest University of Rochester Reference Libraries

Edward Gibson
2012-10-02 10:32:09

Edward Gibson is a former astronaut for NASA as well as a pilot, engineer, and physicist. He was born Edward George Gibson on November 8, 1936 in Buffalo, New York. After his graduation from Kenmore Senior High School, he went on to attend the University of Rochester in New York State where he earned his Bachelor of Science degree in engineering in June 1959. He subsequently attended the California Institute of Technology where he earned his Master of Science degree in engineering in June...

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Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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