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Latest University of Rochester Stories

2010-06-01 19:26:23

Scientists are making strides against cerebral malaria, a fatal form of malaria in children that can ravage the brain and is extremely difficult to treat. New research points to platelets "“ known for their role in blood clotting "“ as playing an important role in the disease, stimulating the immune system and turning on molecules that increase inflammation. The inflammation leads to the obstruction of blood vessels in the brain, causing brain damage similar to that seen with a...

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2010-05-29 09:35:00

According to research presented Thursday at a New York University conference on games as a learning tool, playing video games might help improve vision and other brain functions. "People that play these fast-paced games have better vision, better attention and better cognition," said Daphne Bavelier, an assistant professor in the department of brain and cognitive science at the University of Rochester. Bavelier was a presenter at Games for Learning, which is a daylong symposium on the...

2010-05-27 09:59:13

Implications for treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome, No. 1 cause of female infertility Male sex hormones, such as testosterone, have well defined roles in male reproduction and prostate cancer. What may surprise many is that they also play an important role in female fertility. A new study finds that the presence and activity of male sex hormones in the ovaries helps regulate female fertility, likely by controlling follicle growth and development and preventing deterioration of...

2010-05-26 09:58:35

HDL cholesterol can transform from good to bad actor in heart disease process We've all heard about the importance of raising HDL, or the so-called "good" cholesterol, and lowering LDL, or "bad" cholesterol, to improve heart health. While we've come to assume HDL cholesterol is an inherently good thing, a new study shows that for a certain group of patients, this is not always the case. The study is the first to find that a high level of the supposedly good cholesterol places a subgroup of...

2010-05-14 13:29:30

70 percent reduction in heart failure; double the benefit of men For women with mild heart failure, device therapy is an extremely attractive option to prevent progression of the disease, according to a study presented today at the Heart Rhythm Society's 31st Annual Scientific Sessions. Women with mild heart disease who had a cardiac resynchronization device combined with a defibrillator (CRT-D) implanted had a 70 percent reduction in heart failure alone and a 72 percent reduction in death...

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2010-05-04 10:25:00

Scientists have uncovered evidence contained within South African rocks which shows that a weak magnetic field was present on Earth nearly 3.5 billion years ago. The evidence in question was found inside of dacite rocks from the Barberton mountain range by University of Rochester professor John Tarduno and a team of researchers. The discovery was presented during the European Geosciences Union conference in Vienna, Austria, and was also the topic of a May 4 article by BBC News science...

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2010-04-30 08:32:57

A new study from the University of Rochester finds that there is no single advanced area of the human brain that gives it language capabilities above and beyond those of any other animal species. Instead, humans rely on several regions of the brain, each designed to accomplish different primitive tasks, in order to make sense of a sentence. Depending on the type of grammar used in forming a given sentence, the brain will activate a certain set of regions to process it, like a carpenter...

2010-04-29 14:32:00

Rochester's 'Jumping Frog Lab' part of worldwide team decoding Xenopus tropicalis ROCHESTER, N.Y., April 29 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- An African clawed frog has joined the spotted green puffer fish, the honeybee, and the human among the ranks of more than 175 organisms that have had their genetic information nearly completely sequenced. While the research could help scientists better understand the factors causing the vast die-off of amphibians around the globe, scientists are also...

2010-04-05 09:52:00

ROCHESTER, N.Y., April 5 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Motorcycle riders across the country are growing older, and the impact of this trend is evident in emergency rooms daily. Doctors are finding that these aging road warriors are more likely to be injured or die as a result of a motorcycle mishap compared to their younger counterparts. While the typical injured motorcyclist has long been thought of as a young, otherwise healthy victim of sudden injury, a study from the University of...

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2010-04-05 10:57:41

Motorcycle riders across the country are growing older, and the impact of this trend is evident in emergency rooms daily. Doctors are finding that these aging road warriors are more likely to be injured or die as a result of a motorcycle mishap compared to their younger counterparts. While the typical injured motorcyclist has long been thought of as a young, otherwise healthy victim of sudden injury, a study from the University of Rochester Medical Center suggests otherwise. Between 1996 and...


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Edward Gibson
2012-10-02 10:32:09

Edward Gibson is a former astronaut for NASA as well as a pilot, engineer, and physicist. He was born Edward George Gibson on November 8, 1936 in Buffalo, New York. After his graduation from Kenmore Senior High School, he went on to attend the University of Rochester in New York State where he earned his Bachelor of Science degree in engineering in June 1959. He subsequently attended the California Institute of Technology where he earned his Master of Science degree in engineering in June...

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