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Latest University of Rochester Stories

Nerve Cells Help Our Brain Make Sense Of Our Senses
2011-11-21 10:56:22

[ Watch the Video ] The human brain is bombarded with a cacophony of information from the eyes, ears, nose, mouth and skin. Now a team of scientists at the University of Rochester, Washington University in St. Louis, and Baylor College of Medicine has unraveled how the brain manages to process those complex, rapidly changing, and often conflicting sensory signals to make sense of our world. The answer lies in a relatively simple computation performed by single nerve cells, an operation...

2011-11-14 23:11:38

The brain scans of high school football and hockey players showed subtle injury -- even if they did not suffer a concussion — after taking routine hits to the head during the normal course of play, according to a University of Rochester Medical Center study. The research, reported  online in the journal Magnetic Resonance Imaging, is preliminary, involving a small sample of athletes, but nonetheless raises powerful questions about the consequences of the mildest head injury...

2011-11-11 18:40:56

For the past 100 years, the Haber-Bosch process has been used to convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia, which is essential in the manufacture of fertilizer. Despite the longstanding reliability of the process, scientists have had little understanding of how it actually works. But now a team of chemists, led by Patrick Holland of the University of Rochester, has new insight into how the ammonia is formed. Their findings are published in the latest issue of Science. Holland calls...

2011-10-13 11:32:22

Scientists have improved upon their own previous world-best efforts to pluck out just the right stem cells to address the brain problem at the core of multiple sclerosis and a large number of rare, fatal children´s diseases. Details of how scientists isolated and directed stem cells from the human brain to become oligodendrocytes — the type of brain cell that makes myelin, a crucial fatty material that coats neurons and allows them to signal effectively — were published...

2011-10-05 19:09:45

In the best of circumstances, raising a toddler is a daunting undertaking. But parents under long-term stress often find it particularly challenging to tap into the patience, responsiveness, and energy required for effective child rearing. Now research from a University of Rochester team helps to explain why chronic stress and parenting are such a toxic mix. The study finds that ongoing strains, like poverty or depression, disrupt the body's natural stress response, making mothers more...

2011-09-19 23:08:35

Research Disputes Established Theory on Chromosome Activity Fruit flies have been indispensible to our understanding of genetics and biological processes in all animals, including humans. Yet, despite being one of the most studied of animals, scientists are still finding the fruit fly to be capable of surprises, as evidenced by new research at the University of Rochester. The latest revelation has to do with the activity of the X chromosome in male fruit flies. It was widely accepted...

2011-07-08 10:00:00

ROCHESTER, N.Y., July 8, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Is your kid a "dove" - cautious and submissive when confronting new environments, or perhaps you have a "hawk" - bold and assertive in unfamiliar settings? These basic temperamental patterns are linked to opposite hormonal responses to stress - differences that may provide children with advantages for navigating threatening environments, researchers report in a study published online July 8 in Development and Psychopathology....

2011-07-01 09:41:00

ROCHESTER, N.Y., July 1, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Scientists have come up with new insight into the brain processes that cause the following optical illusion: Focus your eyes directly on the "X" in the center of the image in this short video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXnUckHbPqM&feature=player_embedded). The yellow jacket (Rocky, the mascot of the University of Rochester) appears to be expanding. But he is not. He is staying still. We simply think he is growing because...

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2011-06-29 07:10:00

Scientists have come up with new insight into the brain processes that cause the following optical illusion. Look at the 'X' in this video  The yellow jacket (Rocky, the mascot of the University of Rochester) appears to be expanding. But he is not. He is staying still. We simply think he is growing because our brains have adapted to the inward motion of the background and that has become our new status quo. Similar situations arise constantly in our day-to-day lives "“ jump off a...

2011-06-20 13:30:02

Disclosing Sexual Orientation Makes People Even Happier Than Thought, But Mainly in Supportive Settings Coming out as lesbian, gay, or bisexual increases emotional well-being even more than earlier research has indicated. But the psychological benefits of revealing one's sexual identity "” less anger, less depression, and higher self-esteem "“ are limited to supportive settings, shows a study published June 20 in Social Psychology and Personality Science. The findings underscore...


Latest University of Rochester Reference Libraries

Edward Gibson
2012-10-02 10:32:09

Edward Gibson is a former astronaut for NASA as well as a pilot, engineer, and physicist. He was born Edward George Gibson on November 8, 1936 in Buffalo, New York. After his graduation from Kenmore Senior High School, he went on to attend the University of Rochester in New York State where he earned his Bachelor of Science degree in engineering in June 1959. He subsequently attended the California Institute of Technology where he earned his Master of Science degree in engineering in June...

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Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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