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Latest University of Rochester Stories

2011-09-19 23:08:35

Research Disputes Established Theory on Chromosome Activity Fruit flies have been indispensible to our understanding of genetics and biological processes in all animals, including humans. Yet, despite being one of the most studied of animals, scientists are still finding the fruit fly to be capable of surprises, as evidenced by new research at the University of Rochester. The latest revelation has to do with the activity of the X chromosome in male fruit flies. It was widely accepted...

2011-07-08 10:00:00

ROCHESTER, N.Y., July 8, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Is your kid a "dove" - cautious and submissive when confronting new environments, or perhaps you have a "hawk" - bold and assertive in unfamiliar settings? These basic temperamental patterns are linked to opposite hormonal responses to stress - differences that may provide children with advantages for navigating threatening environments, researchers report in a study published online July 8 in Development and Psychopathology....

2011-07-01 09:41:00

ROCHESTER, N.Y., July 1, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Scientists have come up with new insight into the brain processes that cause the following optical illusion: Focus your eyes directly on the "X" in the center of the image in this short video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXnUckHbPqM&feature=player_embedded). The yellow jacket (Rocky, the mascot of the University of Rochester) appears to be expanding. But he is not. He is staying still. We simply think he is growing because...

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2011-06-29 07:10:00

Scientists have come up with new insight into the brain processes that cause the following optical illusion. Look at the 'X' in this video  The yellow jacket (Rocky, the mascot of the University of Rochester) appears to be expanding. But he is not. He is staying still. We simply think he is growing because our brains have adapted to the inward motion of the background and that has become our new status quo. Similar situations arise constantly in our day-to-day lives "“ jump off a...

2011-06-20 13:30:02

Disclosing Sexual Orientation Makes People Even Happier Than Thought, But Mainly in Supportive Settings Coming out as lesbian, gay, or bisexual increases emotional well-being even more than earlier research has indicated. But the psychological benefits of revealing one's sexual identity "” less anger, less depression, and higher self-esteem "“ are limited to supportive settings, shows a study published June 20 in Social Psychology and Personality Science. The findings underscore...

2011-06-16 21:29:36

Findings could lead to treatments to prevent premature aging and cancer Cells in the human body are constantly being exposed to stress from environmental chemicals or errors in routine cellular processes. While stress can cause damage, it can also provide the stimulus for undoing the damage. New research by a team of scientists at the University of Rochester has unveiled an important new mechanism that allows cells to recognize when they are under stress and prime the DNA repair machinery to...

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2011-06-04 15:35:00

What links speed, power, and the color red? Hint: it's not a sports car.It's your muscles.A new study, published in the latest issue of the journal Emotion, finds that when humans see red, their reactions become both faster and more forceful. And people are unaware of the color's intensifying effect.The findings may have applications for sporting and other activities in which a brief burst of strength and speed is needed, such as weightlifting. But the authors caution that the color energy...

2011-06-03 08:30:00

ROCHESTER, N.Y., June 3, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- What links speed, power, and the color red? Hint: it's not a sports car. It's your muscles. A new study, published in the latest issue of the journal Emotion, finds that when humans see red, their reactions become both faster and more forceful. And people are unaware of the color's intensifying effect. The findings may have applications for sporting and other activities in which a brief burst of strength and speed is needed, such...

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2011-04-15 06:35:00

Cognitive scientists conducting a study at the University of Rochester's Baby Lab suggest that parents who stumble and hesitate -- known as disfluences -- with words like "um" and "uh" when talking to their toddlers are actually helping them learn language more efficiently. Scientists found that the disfluences signal to the toddler that something important is trying to be said and they should be more attentive, according to researchers. Toddlers have a lot of information they have to...

2011-04-13 21:18:06

High Rates of Induction, Primary C-Section Do Not Improve Infant Outcomes in Low-Risk Women at Community Hospitals In low-risk pregnant women, high induction and first-cesarean delivery rates do not lead to improved outcomes for newborns, according to new research published in the April issue of The Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine. The finding that rates of intervention at delivery "“ whether high, low, or in the middle "“ had no bearing on the health of new babies...


Latest University of Rochester Reference Libraries

Edward Gibson
2012-10-02 10:32:09

Edward Gibson is a former astronaut for NASA as well as a pilot, engineer, and physicist. He was born Edward George Gibson on November 8, 1936 in Buffalo, New York. After his graduation from Kenmore Senior High School, he went on to attend the University of Rochester in New York State where he earned his Bachelor of Science degree in engineering in June 1959. He subsequently attended the California Institute of Technology where he earned his Master of Science degree in engineering in June...

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Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'