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Latest University of Rochester Stories

2011-03-22 23:12:17

Rochester Researchers Identify Window of Vulnerability in Fetal Development A mother's iron deficiency early in pregnancy may have a profound and long-lasting effect on the brain development of the child, even if the lack of iron is not enough to cause severe anemia, according to a University of Rochester Medical Center study published in the scientific journal PLoS One. The results are important because obstetricians might not notice or treat mild or moderate iron deficiency, and therefore...

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2011-03-10 09:51:03

Scientists are untangling how the tiniest pollution particles "“ which we take in with every breath we breathe "“ affect our health, making people more vulnerable to cardiovascular and respiratory problems. While scientists know that air pollution can aggravate heart problems, showing exactly how it does so has been challenging. In a study published recently in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, scientists showed that in people with diabetes, breathing ultrafine...

2011-03-07 21:38:28

URMC Research Confirms Possible Use of Drug for Painful Fibroids Research continues to show that the controversial abortion drug mifepristone might have another use, as a therapeutic option besides hysterectomy for women who suffer from severe symptoms associated with uterine fibroids. The University of Rochester Medical Center in 2004 began investigating mifepristone, in a class of drugs known as progesterone receptor modulators (PRMs), to treat fibroids, which affect roughly half of all...

2011-03-02 02:08:54

Mild heart failure patients with a particular condition that results in disorganized electrical activity throughout the heart benefit substantially from cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT"“D), according to a study published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation. In patients with the condition, known as left bundle branch block or LBBB, CRT-D therapy reduced heart failure progression and the risk of ventricular tachyarrhythmias, fast and potentially...

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2011-02-20 07:49:07

Technology could allow for simpler and less invasive skin cancer detection University of Rochester optics professor Jannick Rolland has developed an optical technology that provides unprecedented images under the skin's surface. The aim of the technology is to detect and examine skin lesions to determine whether they are benign or cancerous without having to cut the suspected tumor out of the skin and analyze it in the lab. Instead, the tip of a roughly one-foot-long cylindrical probe is...

2011-02-18 16:40:25

Inducing labor without a medical reason is associated with negative outcomes for the mother, including increased rates of cesarean delivery, greater blood loss and an extended length of stay in the hospital, and does not provide any benefit for the newborn. As the number of scheduled deliveries continues to climb, it is important for physicians and mothers-to-be to understand the risks associated with elective induction. The new findings, published in the February issue of the Journal of...

2011-02-14 14:56:16

Recently revised recommendations may be high for most obese Extremely obese women may not need to gain as much weight during pregnancy as current guidelines suggest, according to a new study presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine annual meeting. Severely obese women who gained less than the recommended amount of weight during the second and third trimester of pregnancy suffered no ill effects, nor did their babies. In contrast, obese and non-obese women who gained less...

2011-02-07 15:10:56

Why in the United States are the rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer? Part of the answer lies in the unique economies of our larger cities, finds a study by Ronni Pavan of the University of Rochester and Nathaniel Baum-Snow of Brown University and the National Bureau of Economic Research. "Our results show that overall up to one-third of the growth in the wage gap between the rich and the poor is driven by city size independent of workers' skills," says Pavan. Using U.S. Census...

2011-02-04 00:11:28

Findings to be published in Cell Stem Cell The human body has a remarkable ability to heal itself. Due to the presence of dedicated stem cells, many organs can undergo continuous renewal. When an organ becomes damaged, stem cells in the organ are typically activated, producing new cells to regenerate the tissue. This activity of stem cells, however, has to be carefully controlled, as too much stem cell activity can cause diseases like cancer. Current research in stem cell biology is starting...

2011-01-28 08:30:00

ROCHESTER, N.Y., Jan. 28, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- When elderly drivers get behind the wheel, they often confront the harrowing reality that they cannot easily see other cars, pedestrians, or cyclists moving around them. This frightening effect of aging, it turns out, is not necessarily a result of a reduced ability to perceive moving objects, as one might suspect, but a heightened awareness of the backdrop against which these objects move. A team of scientists led by University of...


Latest University of Rochester Reference Libraries

Edward Gibson
2012-10-02 10:32:09

Edward Gibson is a former astronaut for NASA as well as a pilot, engineer, and physicist. He was born Edward George Gibson on November 8, 1936 in Buffalo, New York. After his graduation from Kenmore Senior High School, he went on to attend the University of Rochester in New York State where he earned his Bachelor of Science degree in engineering in June 1959. He subsequently attended the California Institute of Technology where he earned his Master of Science degree in engineering in June...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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