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Latest University of Stavanger Stories

Oil Companies Work In Extreme Conditions
2012-11-26 11:49:18

University of Stavanger The northward shift of Norway's oil industry means it must adjust to temperatures down to -30°C, storms, sleet and snow, and drift ice; and to the blackest night "Try to imagine changing a tyre in freezing weather, snow and darkness," says professor Tore Markeset, a specialist in cold climate technology at the University of Stavanger (UiS). That is his way of visualizing the challenges facing oil companies seeking to produce oil and gas from the far north...

2012-01-19 13:33:06

Youngsters in Norway today are not as fit as earlier generations, and even the best perform less well. Researchers now warn that a wave of inactivity could have a major long-term health impact. The conclusions about the physical condition of young people build on a survey of Norwegian schoolchildren´s performance in the 3 000-metre race from 1969 to 2009. Associate professors Leif Inge Tjelta and Sindre Dyrstad at the University of Stavanger (UiS) have drawn on notes kept by a...

2012-01-06 14:41:57

The probability of being killed at work is 25 times higher for a coastal fisherman than for an offshore worker, according to a study from the UiS. Seafarers also run a high risk of accidents. Fifteen people died on vessels registered in Norway during 2010, figures from the Norwegian Maritime Directorate (NMD) show. Eight of these were fishermen. Although these statistics show that the number of work accidents went down in 2009-10, the total has remained at a high and stable level for...

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2011-01-19 14:30:00

By Trond Egil Toft, University of Stavanger Writing by hand strengthens the learning process. When typing on a keyboard, this process may be impaired. Associate professor Anne Mangen at the University of Stavanger's Reading Centre asks if something is lost in switching from book to computer screen, and from pen to keyboard. The process of reading and writing involves a number of senses, she explains. When writing by hand, our brain receives feedback from our motor actions, together with the...

2011-01-07 11:20:21

When interviewed by the BBC, the now retired BP boss Tony Hayward admitted to his company's insufficient response to the Deepwater Horizon rig accident in the Gulf of Mexico. Could the company have been better prepared for what turned out to be one of the biggest oil disasters in history? "We were making it up day to day," Hayward said of BP's rescue plan. Together with chairman of the board, Carl-Henrik Svenberg, he was held responsible for 11 dead and 17 injured workers. According to the...

2010-12-29 13:56:15

Digital bullying among young people is on the rise. Now we need some network action, UiS researchers say. Two out of three children have experienced bullying via the Internet or mobile phones according to a survey made by Telenor in 2008. The survey also shows that parents are uncertain about what to do about this kind of bullying. Research Fellow Tove Flack at the Centre for Behavioural Research (SAF) at the University of Stavanger has extensive experience in counselling work in...

2010-12-29 13:46:56

Conflicting roles among military and civilian personnel is counterproductive to NATO's strategy for peace in Afghanistan, concludes PhD candidate Lillian Katarina Stene after six months in the country. "We must differentiate better between military and civil tasks, and present ourselves more clearly," she says. The former army officer studies civil military coordination in conflicts at the University of Stavanger, Norways' Risk management and societal safety programme. She has interviewed...

2010-08-19 14:53:08

By combining meteorology and archaeology, scientists may discover old sea routes and mooring sites, and boost our knowledge of ancient maritime culture "Archaeology has a long-standing tradition in protecting areas on land. But unfortunately, there is little attention to cultural monuments at the sea-shore and under water," says meteorologist Marianne Nitter at the University of Stavanger's Museum of Archaeology. "These may include mooring and landing sites, jetties, boat-houses, standing...

2010-07-29 16:57:52

What's a Stone Age axe doing in an Iron Age tomb? The archaeologists Olle Hemdorff at the University of Stavanger's Museum of Archaeology and Eva Thäte are researching older objects in younger graves. They have found a pattern. "If one finds something once, it's accidental. If it is found twice, it's puzzling. If found thrice, there is a pattern", the archaeologists Olle Hemdorff and Eva Thäte say. In 2005 the archaeologists investigated a grave at Avaldsnes in Karmøy in...

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2010-03-22 09:38:45

More than a third of Ghana's population believe that AIDS is caused by witchcraft. But large-scale intervention programs for improving health standards have convinced people to trust medical explanations of the disease. Seen through western eyes, beliefs in supernatural forces are common in Ghana and other African countries. Death, suffering and diseases are often attributed to witchcraft. Over thirty percent of its inhabitants believe such evil forces could be responsible for the spread of...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.