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Latest University of Tennessee Stories

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2010-06-18 09:40:33

Findings released during the annual Goldschmidt Conference at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville By examining 800,000-year-old polar ice, scientists increasingly are learning how the climate has changed since the last ice melt and that carbon dioxide has become more abundant in the Earth's atmosphere. For two decades, French scientist J©rôme Chappellaz has been examining ice cores collected from deep inside the polar ice caps of Greenland and Antarctica. His...

2010-06-17 14:51:30

Findings released during the annual Goldschmidt Conference at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville Humans need plants to survive, and plants need soil. But what happens when human, geological and climatic activity alters soil composition and structure and diminishes the amount of fertile land available? Erosion and weathering can hinder the soil's ability to maintain a nutritional balance -- a process crucial to maintaining life around the globe. "Our sustenance is all based on the soil,...

2010-06-17 14:44:20

Findings released during the annual Goldschmidt Conference at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville As carbon dioxide continues to burgeon in the atmosphere causing the Earth's climate to warm, scientists are trying to find ways to remove the excess gas from the atmosphere and store it where it can cause no trouble. Sigurdur Gislason of the University of Iceland has been studying the possibility of sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in basalt and presented his findings today to several...

2010-06-17 14:41:13

Findings released during the annual Goldschmidt Conference at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville Some bacteria destroy oil. Might those bacteria lead oil companies to change their methods of harvesting the energy of the oil while at the same time reducing the carbon dioxide that burning oil and gasoline discharges into the atmosphere? Steve Larter thinks that may be possible. Larter, professor of geoscience and holder of the Canada Research Chair in Petroleum Geology at the University of...

2010-06-16 21:42:59

Findings released during the annual Goldschmidt Conference at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville How do we begin to understand what early life was like on Earth about 700 million years ago as our planet shifted from an oxygen-free and probably ice-covered realm to the oxygen-rich world that we know today? One geochemist who decodes the early record of life on Earth has found a method featuring a combination of chemical analyses for a significantly clearer picture of this dynamic...

2010-06-16 21:41:29

Findings released during the annual Goldschmidt Conference at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville Scientists who work at the atomic and molecular levels "“ nanoscale "“ have to think big. After all, it is at this level where everything happens. Alexandra Navrotsky, Distinguished Professor at the University of California, Davis, and Director of its Nanomaterials in the Environment, Agriculture, and Technology Organized Research Unit, has studied the properties of nanoparticles...

2010-06-16 21:39:45

Findings released at the annual Goldschmidt Conference at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville As carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere rise, policy makers and scientists are looking at new ways to tackle the problems associated with the greenhouse gas. One method under much discussion is carbon capture and storage (CCS), otherwise known as carbon sequestration. CCS, a newly developing technology, involves injecting carbon dioxide underground to remove it from the Earth's atmosphere....

2010-06-15 12:56:00

KNOXVILLE, Tenn., June 15 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Brian Wirth, an authority in the ways materials behave in extreme environments, has been named the ninth University of Tennessee-Oak Ridge National Laboratory Governor's Chair. Wirth is currently an associate professor at the University of California, Berkeley, which he joined in 2002 following several years as a materials scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Wirth leads a number of research projects funded by various...

2010-06-15 15:25:19

Findings released at the annual Goldschmidt Conference at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville New intense sources of radiation at national facilities in Chicago, New York, and Tennessee coupled with the next generation of sensitive detectors are allowing geochemists like John Parise to gather images and data on minerals in one second that would take years of equivalent exposure on conventional laboratory x-ray facilities. John Parise, professor, mineralogist and solid-state chemist at...

2010-06-14 15:08:14

Findings released at the annual Goldschmidt Conference at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville Research by a small group of microbiologists is revealing how marine microbes live in a mysterious area of the Earth: the realm just beneath the deep ocean floor. The ocean crust may be the largest biological reservoir on our planet. Beth Orcutt, a post-doctoral fellow at Aarhus University in Denmark and the University of Southern California, presented her new findings about this little researched...


Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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