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Latest University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Stories

2014-07-29 23:13:49

San Antonio researcher leads national study that identified a combination of pills that cures 9 of 10 hepatitis C patients. San Antonio, TX (PRWEB) July 29, 2014 Researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, the Texas Liver Institute and other institutions have identified a combination of pills that cures 9 of 10 hepatitis C patients. The combination of the drugs sofosbuvir and simeprevir, with or without ribavirin, cured 93 percent of patients in 12...

2014-05-20 12:10:40

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Recruiting more Hispanics to cancer clinical trials crucial to reducing health disparities Hispanics are the fastest-growing demographic group in the United States, and they suffer from major health disparities, including higher rates of cancers of the cervix, stomach and liver. However, their enrollment levels in cancer clinical trials seeking to cure these problems is abysmally low: 3.9 percent. In a paper published today...

2013-09-09 11:32:11

Discovery provides target to potentially halt the process, prevent cancers Biologists reported today in Nature that they have identified two pathways through which chromosomes are rearranged in mammalian cells. These types of changes are associated with some cancers and inherited disorders in people. "Our finding provides a target to prevent these rearrangements, so we could conceivably prevent cancer in some high-risk people," said senior author Edward P. (Paul) Hasty, D.V.M., of the...

2013-08-15 11:55:34

A long-term follow-up to a groundbreaking study led by the director of the Cancer Therapy & Research Center confirms that a drug shown to reduce risk of prostate cancer by more than a third has no impact on lifespan but further reduces the risk of prostate cancer. Reducing the risk of prostate tumors by about 30 percent - and low-grade tumors by 43 percent - means thousands of men can avoid a cancer diagnosis and subsequent treatments that significantly affect quality of life, said Ian...

2013-07-18 11:43:53

Precise action sets agents apart from existing anti-cancer therapies Molecular biologists in the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio have found a novel way to fine-tune the activity of cells' protein-disposing machinery, with potentially cancer-fighting effects. This machinery, the proteasome, is deregulated in cancer. Agents called protease inhibitors are viewed as potential anti-cancer therapies, but they indiscriminately curb proteasome...

2013-05-27 23:14:07

HealthCrave´s Primary Care Center offers the full range of medical treatments to those who are two-years-old to those who are a hundred-years-old. San Antonio, TX (PRWEB) May 27, 2013 San Antonio HealthCrave Medical Centers has a ward that patients can visit for all of their medical needs. The Primary Care Center offers the entire range of treatments, from diagnosing a mild cold to prescribing a disease prevention program. And whether patients are two-years-old or one...

2013-05-27 10:49:17

The news about youth and diabetes keeps getting worse. The latest data from the national TODAY diabetes study shows that children who develop Type 2 diabetes are at high risk to develop heart, kidney and eye problems faster and at a higher rate than people who acquire Type 2 diabetes as adults. "Once these kids have Type 2 diabetes, they seem to be at very high risk for early complications when compared to adults," said Jane Lynch, M.D., professor of pediatric endocrinology in the School...

Obesity More Likely For Marmosets That Started On Solid Food Early
2013-04-10 13:34:05

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Infants that became obese took bigger slurps at lick device Baby marmoset monkeys that began eating solid food earlier than their peers were significantly more likely to be obese at 1 year of age, scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio and the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute found. This early life obesity resulted in metabolic damage such as insulin resistance and poor blood sugar...


Word of the Day
out-herod
  • In the phrase to out-herod Herod, to be more violent than Herod (as represented in the old mystery plays); hence, to exceed in any excess of evil.
Herod refers to 'Herod the Great,' a Roman client king and 'a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis.' According to the OED, the term is 'chiefly with allusion to Shakespeare's use' in Hamlet.
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