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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 21:20 EDT

Latest University of Texas Medical Branch Stories

2011-09-01 15:24:41

Researchers have found that a protein variation linked by some genetic studies to Alzheimer's disease is consistently present in the brains of people with Alzheimer's. In further biochemical and cell culture investigations, they have shown that this protein, known as ubiquilin-1, performs a critical Alzheimer's-related function: it "chaperones" the formation of amyloid precursor protein, a molecule whose malformation has been directly tied to Alzheimer's pathology. "What we saw here is...

2011-08-24 07:00:00

Texas' Electronic Medical Records (EMR) program saved Texas taxpayers nearly $1 billion over the last 10 years says the Gartner Group. Austin, TX (PRWEB) August 24, 2011 Despite the fact that Texas has one of the highest incarceration rates in the country and health care costs to inmates are rapidly increasing nationally, the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) through the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) has teamed with Atlanta's Business Computer Applications, Inc. (BCA)...

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2011-08-22 20:02:26

Novel approach may offer treatment for other bacterial diseases Researchers at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have discovered a molecular process by which the body can defend against the effects of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), pointing the way to a promising new approach for treating an intestinal disease that has become more common, more severe and harder to cure in recent years. In the U.S., several million...

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2011-08-22 15:09:17

Researchers may have discovered an impressive new weapon in the struggle against hospital-acquired bacterial infections, Reuters is reporting. Clostridium difficile is an antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection that can cause diarrhea, colitis, the inflammation of the colon. At its worst, it can be fatal and is often spread around hospitals and medical facilities. Tests of an experimental compound are mimicking the human defense mechanism, used by cells in the gut to neutralize harmful...

2011-08-12 12:35:06

NIH awards $3 million to prepare for clinical trials; developers hope vaccine will alleviate suffering caused by mosquito-borne virus in Asia and Africa and limit its spread Researchers have developed a new candidate vaccine to protect against chikungunya virus, a mosquito-borne pathogen that produces an intensely painful and often chronic arthritic disease that has stricken millions of people in India, Southeast Asia and Africa. A single dose of the experimental vaccine protected lab mice...

2011-08-02 13:02:36

First national study of hospitalists' effect on costs and post-discharge medical usage underscores problems with continuity of care Inpatients cared for by hospitalists have higher Medicare costs in the 30 days after discharge than those whose personal physicians oversee their care. This is partly because hospitalists' patients are more likely to be discharged to a rehabilitation or nursing facility than to their homes and more likely to have subsequent emergency room visits and readmissions....

2011-07-12 22:19:22

Systemic scleroderma has slowed Tracy Zinn but it has not stopped her from working. Thanks in part to determination and an accommodating employer, Zinn is now in her 13th year as an account executive for a firm that produces educational software. But, many with the incapacitating disease are not as fortunate. In the United States, the work disability rate for people with systemic scleroderma, also known as systemic sclerosis, is two to three times that of people with some other rheumatic...

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2011-06-09 05:05:00

The need to create a new flu vaccine annually could be eliminated with a universal influenza vaccine that targets a protein common to all strains of influenza A, which has been able to safely produce an immune response in humans, according to a study published in the journal Vaccine. If proven effective, it will have major implications for global health. Two studies were conducted, one at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) and one at Johnson County Clin-Trials in...

2011-05-18 13:18:48

Cell signaling networks tied to diabetes and cancer Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and the University of California-San Diego School of Medicine have published a study that offers a new understanding of a protein critical to physiological processes involved in major diseases such as diabetes and cancer. This work could help scientists design drugs to battle these disorders. The article was deemed a "Paper of the Week" by and will be on the cover of the...

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2011-05-10 11:45:00

A recent study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine on the number of colon screenings that are performed on the elderly suggests that doctors are ordering repeated tests that many people do not need. Long known to be one of the most effective and easy screening tests available, colon screening is credited with saving thousands of lives by catching cancer early. The physician uses a thin flexible tube to examine the intestines which can also snip off suspicious-looking growths. The...