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Latest University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna Stories

Wolves Learn From Each Other Better Than Dogs
2014-01-31 07:52:25

University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna Although wolves and dogs are closely related, they show some striking differences. Scientists from the Messerli Research Institute at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna have undertaken experiments that suggest that wolves observe one another more closely than dogs and so are better at learning from one another. The scientists believe that cooperation among wolves is the basis of the understanding between dogs and humans. Their findings...

Harness For Guide Dogs Must Suit Both Dog And Owner
2014-01-02 09:26:41

University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna A guide dog communicates with a blind person via a harness and its handle. Researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna) have investigated for the first time the forces guide dogs are exposed to during their work. Physiotherapists and movement analysts compared three types of harness to find which is best for the dog and the owner. The results were recently published in The Veterinary Journal. Guide dogs lend...

Tree Sparrows Recognize Foreign Eggs In Their Nest By Color And Shape
2013-12-11 09:23:39

University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna Many birds have reason to worry that the eggs in their nest might not be their own: birds often deposit eggs into other nests and it is not easy for parents to tell their eggs from others. Researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna have discovered that tree sparrows can recognize eggs deposited by other tree sparrows but do not always reject them. The results are published in the online journal Plos One. Building a nest, laying...

2013-10-30 09:59:25

Listeria poses a significant risk to human health. The main transmission route involves meat and dairy products, so it is important to treat dairies and food-processing plants regularly with disinfectants to kill bacteria. Unfortunately, listeria is developing resistance to the compounds that are most frequently used. Recent work in the group of Stephan Schmitz-Esser at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna) has uncovered the mechanism for listeria’s resistance to...

How Dormice Make Optimal Use Of Their Body Fat Reserves
2013-10-22 14:05:32

University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna Edible dormice store considerable amounts of fat in summer. Their fat reserves are necessary for them to survive a long hibernation – on average 8 months – in underground cavities. But how do hibernators allocate surplus body fat reserves to optimize survival? Researchers at the Research Institute of Wildlife Ecology of the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, have found that animals with larger fat reserves prefer boosting their...

New Medicines Developed For Llamas And Alpacas
2013-10-18 11:02:37

University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna Llamas and alpacas are becoming increasingly popular in Europe and are highly appreciated as trekking animals and as sources of wool. Although they are robust, they occasionally fall ill but there are no authorized drugs for the species on the market. Researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna) have developed an oral “paste” that can be mixed with drugs and used to treat camelids for a wide variety of diseases....

2013-10-08 11:26:44

Understanding how viral proteins are produced can provide important clues on how we might interfere with the process. The group of Till Rümenapf at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna) has discovered that a key protease of a particular virus breaks itself down into two different functional molecules. The findings are reported in the Journal of Virology and may have important implications for the development of defence strategies against diseases caused by...

2013-09-18 15:43:41

Saving energy is important for humans and animals alike when resources are limited. Scientists at the Research Institute of Wildlife Ecology of the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, found out that although higher-ranked red deer gain privileged access to patches of food, they also have higher metabolic rates and thus use more energy. This can be a serious disadvantage in winter when red deer rely largely on their limited stored body fat to survive. Energy budget adjustments...

2013-07-19 15:43:59

A surprisingly large number of dogs suffer from hyperadrenocorticism.  The symptoms are caused by excessive amounts of hormones – glucocorticoids – in the body.  Unfortunately, though, diagnosis of the disease is complicated by the fact that glucocorticoid levels naturally fluctuate and most methods for measuring the concentration of the hormones in the blood provide only a snapshot of the current situation.  Recent...

2013-06-25 13:11:55

Until recently, horses were generally branded to be able to identify individual animals. Since this practice gives rise to longstanding wounds and brand marks cannot be reliably read, there has been a gradual switch towards the use of microchips. But how reliably can microchips be located and read, and are the horses injured by having chips implanted? These issues have been addressed by the team of Christine Aurich at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna. The results are available...


Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.