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Latest University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna Stories

Crash Landings And Swans
2012-11-26 20:07:55

University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna Despite — or perhaps because of — their large size, swans seem particularly prone to injury. Known problems include collisions with cars, lead poisoning due to gunshot wounds or ingested foreign bodies and injuries from fishing hooks. Injuries to the birds´ hips, however, are believed to be uncommon. Michaela Gumpenberger and Alexandra Scope of the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna now present evidence to suggest that such...

2012-06-19 23:12:26

Individuals in some species learn information about food, predators, and potential mates indirectly from conspecifics, without taking unnecessary risks by learning directly for themselves (℠social learning´).  Sarah Zala and Dustin Penn from the Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology of the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna investigated whether zebrafish use social learning to assess risk (℠boldness/shyness´ behavior). They found that wild zebrafish, which are...

2012-04-27 22:06:21

Dr. Claudia Bieber from the Research Institute of Wildlife Ecology (FIWI) of the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, and fellow scientists analysed a capture-recapture data set on common dormice (Muscardinus avellanarius) to investigate the life-history strategy of this species. These small rodents are about the size and weight of a wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus), but, unlike their rodent cousins, they hibernate — usually from late September/October to April/May. This is...

2012-04-24 22:29:26

Although people generally talk about "cancer", it is clear that the disease occurs in a bewildering variety of forms. Even single groups of cancers, such as those of the white blood cells, may show widely differing properties. How do the various cancers arise and what factors determine their progression? Clues to these two issues, at least for leukemias, have now been provided by Boris Kovacic and colleagues at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna). The results are...

2012-02-03 19:00:17

Many living organisms suffer from parasites, which use the hosts´ resources for their own purposes. The problem of parasitism occurs at all levels right down to the DNA scale.  Genomes may contain up to 80% “foreign” DNA but details of the mechanisms by which this enters the host genome and how hosts attempt to combat its spread are still the subject of conjecture.  Important new information comes from the group of Christian Schlötterer at the...

2012-01-30 10:35:30

About one in five or six cases of adult leukemia in Western populations relates to so-called chronic myeloid leukemia, or CML.  Treatment of CML usually relies on inhibitors of the abnormal protein that causes the condition but some patients do not respond to treatment and efforts are underway to develop a supplementary approach, targeting the so-called JAK2 kinase.  Recent results from the groups of Veronika Sexl at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna)...

2012-01-26 12:10:27

It comes as a surprise to many that male house mice produce melodious songs to attract mates.  Unfortunately for us, because the melodies are in the ultra-sonic range human ears cannot detect them.  Through spectrographic analyses of the vocalizations of wild house mice, researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna  have found that the songs of male mice contain signals of individuality and kinship.  Their results appear in the journal Physiology &...

2012-01-17 17:01:23

There is an increasing trend towards nimbyism — people welcome developments in principle, so long as they are “not in my back yard”.  But just how big is a back yard?  The answer depends on a number of factors and Günther Schauberger of the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna) has now developed a mathematical model to calculate appropriate distances from residential areas for livestock building to be sited.  The model is...

2012-01-10 15:16:01

For handball players, ankle sprains are just part of life.  But this may be about to change:  Christian Peham and colleagues at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna have undertaken a detailed analysis of the three most important ligaments in the ankle.  The group investigated the ligaments´ movements and the strains to which they are subjected during the jump shot, the most frequent shot at goal.  The results could help significantly reduce the risk of...

2012-01-05 13:02:29

Not so long ago it was the work of many years to sequence the genome of a single organism: the human genome project, for example, took many laboratories a total of 13 years to complete. The availability of so-called next-generation sequencing methods makes it easy — and comparatively cheap — to sequence DNA, although sequencing the large number of individuals required for population genetics studies is still time-consuming and costly and has thus been restricted to few organisms....


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'karpos', fruit.
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