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Last updated on April 24, 2014 at 21:24 EDT
Brightening Star Offers Astronomers New Way To Study Binary

Brightening Star Offers Astronomers New Way To Study Binary Systems

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers searching for planets orbiting around a distant star look for a signature dimming of that star’s light, but what if the distant star suddenly gets a bit brighter? Astronomers...

Latest University of Washington Stories

2014-04-22 08:29:56

Runner-Up Distinction Awarded to Four Competitors from Ball State University, Montana State University, University of Idaho Integrated Design Lab, and Seek Architecture (Seattle). SEATTLE, April 22, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Today construction company Hammer & Hand unveiled the winners of "perFORM 2014: A House Design Competition." The competition challenged emerging architecture professionals to fuse high design with high performance building in the design of a single-family house in Seattle...

2014-04-21 23:10:13

Eleven Graduate and Undergraduate students in the Computer Sciences Department at the University of Washington, supprted by Professor Bill Erdly, shared their most recent work on their project to develop tools for vision problems that can be efficiently used by educators. Helen Spencer, Yakima-area Americorps director, and Katie Johnson, author of Red Flags for Primary Teachers, were their guests and audience for this progress report. Bothell, WA (PRWEB) April 21, 2014 Four graduate...

acid rain ice cores
2014-04-14 11:18:40

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Over four decades ago, acid rain caused by industrial emissions was eradicating fish and dissolving stone monuments in the Eastern US. However, emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide, both of which cause acid rain, dropped significantly after the passing of the Clean Air Act of 1970. A new study from a team of French and American scientists has revealed that the rise and fall of these atmospheric contaminants has been...

Automated Age-progression Software Shows How A Child Will Age
2014-04-10 14:09:09

By Michelle Ma, University of Washington It’s a guessing game parents like to ponder: What will my child look like when she grows up? A computer could now answer the question in less than a minute. University of Washington researchers have developed software that automatically generates images of a young child’s face as it ages through a lifetime. The technique is the first fully automated approach for aging babies to adults that works with variable lighting, expressions and poses....

2014-04-09 08:29:28

Secures Intellectual Property Rights SEATTLE, April 9, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Oricula Therapeutics, LLC, a biotech company uniquely positioned to introduce medications to preserve hearing, announced that it has secured initial funding and licensed intellectual property from University of Washington. These represent key steps toward achieving the company's vision to commercialize compounds it has developed to prevent certain types of hearing loss. The company's product will be the...

Misinformation Can Spread Like Wildfire On Twitter
2014-03-19 05:40:39

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Twitter can be enormously helpful during an emergency, but it can be just as detrimental when misinformation is rapidly spread during a crisis. Researchers from University of Washington studied last year’s Boston Marathon bombings and found that significant amounts of misinformation spread widely on Twitter despite efforts by users to correct rumors that were inaccurate. The bombings, which took place on April 15, 2013 when...

Scientists Build Thinnest-possible LEDs To Be Stronger And More Energy Efficient
2014-03-11 08:26:27

[ Watch The Video: Extracting Two-Dimensional Materials ] Michelle Ma, University of Washington Most modern electronics, from flat-screen TVs and smartphones to wearable technologies and computer monitors, use tiny light-emitting diodes, or LEDs. These LEDs are based off of semiconductors that emit light with the movement of electrons. As devices get smaller and faster, there is more demand for such semiconductors that are tinier, stronger and more energy efficient. University...

Exoplanet Atmospheres
2014-03-05 07:53:33

John P. Millis, Ph.D. for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The holy grail of planetary astronomy is the search for a potentially habitable planet, or even better, one that is shown to already contain life. There are various parameters that are needed in order to ascertain the habitability of worlds, such as whether liquid water can be sustained on its surface. Recent studies, however, have found that identifying some of these characteristics is rather difficult, and we may in fact...

Battery-free Technology Brings Gesture Recognition System To Electronics
2014-03-03 09:59:42

[ Watch The Video: AllSee: Bringing Gesture Recognition to All Devices ] Michelle Ma, University of Washington Mute the song playing on your smartphone in your pocket by flicking your index finger in the air, or pause your “This American Life” podcast with a small wave of the hand. This kind of gesture control for electronics could soon become an alternative to touchscreens and sensing technologies that consume a lot of power and only work when users can see their smartphones and...

when a pine-scented molecule combines with ozone in the surrounding air, some of the free radicals created in the process grab oxygen with unprecedented speed
2014-02-27 06:28:35

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For atmospheric scientists, pine forests are magical places where coniferous trees give off pine-scented vapors. These vapors form particles, rapidly and seemingly out of nowhere. A new study from an international group of scientists illuminates the process by which gas wafting from coniferous trees creates particles that can reflect sunlight or promote cloud formation. Both are important climate feedbacks. The findings, led by the...